„In the same way that the figure of the peasant tends to disappear, so too does the figure of the industrial worker, the service industry worker and all other separate categories.“

—  Antonio Negri, buch Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire

125
Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Antonio Negri Foto
Antonio Negri
italienischer Moral- und politischer Philosoph 1933

Ähnliche Zitate

Kliment Voroshilov Foto
Bob Black Foto

„All industrial (and office) workers are employees and under the sort of surveillance which ensures servility.“

—  Bob Black, buch The Abolition of Work

The Abolition of Work (1985)
Kontext: I am not playing definitional games with anybody. When I say I want to abolish work, I mean just what I say, but I want to say what I mean by defining my terms in non-idiosyncratic ways. My minimun definition of work is forced labor, that is, compulsory production. Both elements are essential. Work is production enforced by economic or political means, by the carrot or the stick. (The carrot is just the stick by other means.) But not all creation is work. Work is never done for its own sake, it's done on account of some product or output that the worker (or, more often, somebody else) gets out of it. This is what work necessarily is. To define it is to despise it. But work is usually even worse than its definition decrees. The dynamic of domination intrinsic to work tends over time toward elaboration. In advanced work-riddled societies, including all industrial societies whether capitalist or "communist," work invariably acquires other attributes which accentuate its obnoxiousness.
Usually—and this is even more true in "communist" than capitalist countries, where the state is almost the only employer and everyone is an employee — work is employment, i. e., wage-labor, which means selling yourself on the installment plan. Thus 95% of Americans who work, work for somebody (or something) else. In the USSR or Cuba or Yugoslavia or Nicaragua or any other alternative model which might be adduced, the corresponding figure approaches 100%. Only the embattled Third World peasant bastions — Mexico, India, Brazil, Turkey — temporarily shelter significant concentrations of agriculturists who perpetuate the traditional arrangement of most laborers in the last several millennia, the payment of taxes (ransom) to the state or rent to parasitic landlords in return for being otherwise left alone. Even this raw deal is beginning to look good. All industrial (and office) workers are employees and under the sort of surveillance which ensures servility.

David Foster Wallace Foto
Franklin D. Roosevelt Foto
Clinton Edgar Woods Foto
Peter F. Drucker Foto
Ernesto Che Guevara Foto
Chip Berlet Foto

„The very point of developing regulation around industrial society was that they were not only exploiting the workers to death they were befouling the planet, so regulation came because of that.“

—  Chip Berlet American political analyst 1949

Interview (4 November 1994) quoted in Backlash Global Subversion of the Environmental Movement (1996), p. 51
Kontext: You can go to any major history and see the effect of unregulation. The very point of developing regulation around industrial society was that they were not only exploiting the workers to death they were befouling the planet, so regulation came because of that. What the right wing wants is for the public to have this role in the societal debate over balance of these issues and no power. The public power to confront these errors of industry is government regulation.

Antonio Negri Foto
Mary Parker Follett Foto
Nikolai Bukharin Foto
Wallace Stevens Foto

„Does not see these separate figures one by one,
And yet see only one“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction (1942), It Must Be Abstract
Kontext: p>What chieftain, walking by himself, crying
Most miserable, most victorious,Does not see these separate figures one by one,
And yet see only one, in his old coat,
His slouching pantaloons, beyond the town,Looking for what was, where it used to be?</p

Wallace Stevens Foto

„Success as a result of industry is a peasant ideal.“

—  Wallace Stevens American poet 1879 - 1955

As quoted in "Ten Jack-Offs" in The Most Beautiful Woman in Town (1983) by Charles Bukowski

Michael Pollan Foto

„Were the walls of our meat industry to become transparent, literally or even figuratively, we would not long continue to raise, kill, and eat animals the way we do.“

—  Michael Pollan, buch The Omnivore's Dilemma

Quelle: The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: The Penguin Press, 2006), p. 333.
Kontext: The industrialization — and brutalization — of animals in America is a relatively new, evitable, and local phenomenon: No other country raises and slaughters its food animals quite as intensively or as brutally as we do. No other people in history has lived at quite so great a remove from the animals they eat. Were the walls of our meat industry to become transparent, literally or even figuratively, we would not long continue to raise, kill, and eat animals the way we do.

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Foto

„Idealists, workers of thought, unite to show how inspiration and genius walk in step with the progress of the machine, of aircraft, of industry, of trade, of the sciences, of electricity.“

—  Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Italian poet and editor, founder of the Futurist movement 1876 - 1944

Quote of Filippo Marinetti, in his review 'Poesia' 1905; as cited in Futurism, ed. By Didier Ottinger; Centre Pompidou / 5 Continents Editions, Milan, 2008, p. 78
1900's

Robert Crumb Foto

„Industrial civilization figured out how to manufacture popular culture and sell it back to the people. You have to marvel at the ingenuity of it!“

—  Robert Crumb American cartoonist 1943

The R. Crumb Handbook by Robert Crumb and Peter Poplaski (2005), p. 180
Kontext: Before industrial civilization, local and regional communities made their own music, their own entertainment. The esthetics were based on traditions that went far back in time—i. e. folklore. But part of the con of mass culture is to make you forget history, disconnect you from tradition and the past. Sometimes that can be a good thing. Sometimes it can even be revolutionary. But tradition can also keep culture on an authentic human level, the homespun as opposed to the mass produced. Industrial civilization figured out how to manufacture popular culture and sell it back to the people. You have to marvel at the ingenuity of it! The problem is that the longer this buying and selling goes on, the more hollow and bankrupt the culture becomes. It loses its fertility, like worn out, ravaged farmland. Eventually, the yokels who bought the hype, the pitch, they want in on the game. When there are no more naive hicks left, you have a culture where everybody is conning each other all the time. There are no more earnest "squares" left—everybody's "hip", everybody is cynical.

Richard Pipes Foto
Richard D. Wolff Foto

Ähnliche Themen