„Few things are more shocking to those who practice the arts of success than the frank description of those arts.“

“English Aphorists,” p. 123
Reperusals and Recollections (1936)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Logan Pearsall Smith Foto
Logan Pearsall Smith
britisch-amerikanischer Schriftsteller, Aphoristiker und Li… 1865 - 1946

Ähnliche Zitate

Aristotle Foto
Hippocrates Foto

„Medicine is of all the Arts the most noble; but, owing to the ignorance of those who practice it, and of those who, inconsiderately, form a judgment of them, it is at present far behind all the other arts.“

—  Hippocrates ancient Greek physician -460 - -370 v.Chr

1.
The Law
Kontext: Medicine is of all the Arts the most noble; but, owing to the ignorance of those who practice it, and of those who, inconsiderately, form a judgment of them, it is at present far behind all the other arts. Their mistake appears to me to arise principally from this, that in the cities there is no punishment connected with the practice of medicine (and with it alone) except disgrace, and that does not hurt those who are familiar with it. Such persons are like the figures which are introduced in tragedies, for as they have the shape, and dress, and personal appearance of an actor, but are not actors, so also physicians are many in title but very few in reality.

Giorgio Morandi Foto
Vincent Van Gogh Foto
Thomas Jefferson Foto

„Let those flatter, who fear: it is not an American art.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

Summary View of the Rights of British America (1774)
1770s

William Morris Foto
Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Foto

„Only those few people who practice it believe in goodness.“

—  Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach Austrian writer 1830 - 1916

In das Gute glauben nur die Wenigen, die es üben.
Quelle: Aphorisms (1880/1893), p. 29.

Jean Dubuffet Foto
Bertolt Brecht Foto

„That's great art — Everything is self-evident. I am made to cry with those who cry, and laugh with those who laugh.“

—  Bertolt Brecht German poet, playwright, theatre director 1898 - 1956

"Entertainment or Education? (1936)
Kontext: The theater-goer in conventional dramatic theater says: Yes, I've felt that way, too. That's the way I am. That's life. That's the way it will always be. The suffering of this or that person grips me because there is no escape for him. That's great art — Everything is self-evident. I am made to cry with those who cry, and laugh with those who laugh. But the theater-goer in the epic theater says: I would never have thought that. You can't do that. That's very strange, practically unbelievable. That has to stop. The suffering of this or that person grips me because there is an escape for him. That's great art — nothing is self-evident. I am made to laugh about those who cry, and cry about those who laugh.

Henry Taylor Foto
François de La Rochefoucauld Foto

„There are few people who are more often wrong than those who cannot suffer being wrong.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, buch Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

Il n'y a point de gens qui aient plus souvent tort que ceux qui ne peuvent souffrir d'en avoir.
Maxim 386.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

Harun Yahya Foto
Grace Hopper Foto

„To me programming is more than an important practical art. It is also a gigantic undertaking in the foundations of knowledge.“

—  Grace Hopper American computer scientist and United States Navy officer 1906 - 1992

David Sayre, while in a panel discussion with Hopper, as quoted in Management and the Computer of the Future (1962) by Sloan School of Management, p. 277
Misattributed

Evelyn Underhill Foto
Howard S. Becker Foto

„[ Folk art, consists of] work done by ordinary people in the course of their lives, work seldom thought of by those who make or use it as art at all.“

—  Howard S. Becker American sociologist 1928

Quelle: Art Worlds (1982), p. 245 as quoted in: John Ross Hall, Mary Jo Neitz, Marshall Battani (2003) Sociology On Culture. p. 196.

Anatole France Foto

„Those who produced the things necessary for life, wanted them; those who did not produce them had more than enough.“

—  Anatole France, buch Penguin Island

Book VII : Modern Times, Ch. IX : The Final Consequences
Penguin Island (1908)
Kontext: Penguinia gloried in its wealth. Those who produced the things necessary for life, wanted them; those who did not produce them had more than enough. "But these," as a member of the Institute said, "are necessary economic fatalities." The great Penguin people had no longer either traditions, intellectual culture, or arts. The progress of civilisation manifested itself among them by murderous industry, infamous speculation, and hideous luxury. Its capital assumed, as did all the great cities of the time, a cosmopolitan and financial character. An immense and regular ugliness reigned within it. The country enjoyed perfect tranquillity. It had reached its zenith.

John Galsworthy Foto

Ähnliche Themen