„I think the history of humanity is the history of our co-evolution with devices and artifacts that make our lives easier. And I think it's now a question from moral philosophy — not for science — to decide how we use them and what it would mean to be enslaved by them, whether we do so willingly or reluctantly and genuinely.“

App Intelligence, NPR’s To the Best of Our Knowledge, November 27, 2015 https://www.ttbook.org/interview/app-intelligence

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
David Krakauer Foto
David Krakauer3
scientist 1967

Ähnliche Zitate

R. G. Collingwood Foto
Ai Weiwei Foto
Leo Tolstoy Foto

„Science is meaningless because it gives no answer to our question, the only question important for us: 'what shall we do and how shall we live“

—  Leo Tolstoy Russian writer 1828 - 1910

Quoted by Max Weber in his lecture "Science as a Vocation"; in Lynda Walsh (2013), Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy (2013), Oxford University Press, p. 90

„When we estrange ourselves from history we do not enlarge, we diminish ourselves, even as individuals. We subtract from our lives one meaning which they do in fact possess, whether we recognize it or not. We cannot help living in history. We can only fail to be aware of it.“

—  Robert L. Heilbroner American historian and economist 1919 - 2005

Quelle: The Future As History (1960), Chapter IV, Part 9, The Grand Dynamic of History, p. 209
Kontext: In an age which no longer waits patiently through this life for the rewards of the next, it is a crushing spiritual blow to lose one's sense of participation in mankind's journey, and to see only a huge milling-around, a collective living-out of lives with no larger purpose than the days which each accumulates. When we estrange ourselves from history we do not enlarge, we diminish ourselves, even as individuals. We subtract from our lives one meaning which they do in fact possess, whether we recognize it or not. We cannot help living in history. We can only fail to be aware of it. If we are to meet, endure, and transcend the trials and defeats of the future — for trials and defeats there are certain to be — it can only be from a point of view which, seeing the future as part of the sweep of history, enables us to establish our place in that immense procession in which is incorporated whatever hope humankind may have.

„All these things have happened in our history, and we need to talk about them. What kind of country are we that our history is so tragic?“

—  Yuan Tengfei history teacher in Beijing, China 1972

Reported in Didi Kirsten Tatlow, "A System Afraid of Its Own History", The New York Times (September 16, 2010).

Ted Chiang Foto
Daniel Levitin Foto
Dana Loesch Foto

„I think it’s easier to mourn over a lion that’s been killed than over a baby that’s been killed, I think that’s how far we are from our humanity“

—  Dana Loesch American conservative political commentator 1978

Loesch: More Outrage over Lion's Death Than Planned Parenthood Videos http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/07/30/dana-loesch-more-outrage-over-cecil-lion-planned-parenthood-videos (July 30, 2015)

J. B. S. Haldane Foto

„We have now to ask whether God made the tapeworm. And it is questionable whether an affirmative answer fits in either with what we know about the process of evolution or what many of us believe about the moral perfection of God.“

—  J. B. S. Haldane, buch The Causes of Evolution

Quelle: The Causes of Evolution (1932), Ch. V What is Fitness?, pp. 158-159.
Kontext: I have given my reasons for thinking that we can probably explain evolution in terms of the capacity for variation of individual organisms, and the selection exercised on them by their environment....
The most obvious alternative to this view is to hold that evolution has throughout been guided by divine power. There are two objections to this hypothesis. Most lines of descent end in extinction, and commonly the end is reached by a number of different lines evolving in parallel. This does not suggest the work of an intelligent designer, still less of an all mighty one. But the moral objection is perhaps more serious. A very large number of originally free-living Crustacea, worms, and so on, have evolved into parasites. In doing so they have lost, to a greater or less extent, their legs, eyes, and brains, and have become in many cases the course of considerable and prolonged pain to other animals and to man. If we are going to take an ethical point of view at all (and we must do so when discussing theological questions), we are, I think, bound to place this loss of faculties coupled with increased infliction of suffering in the same class as moral breakdown in a human being, which can often be traced to genetical causes. To put the matter in a more concrete way, Blake expressed some doubt as to whether God had made the tiger. But the tiger is in many ways an admirable animal. We have now to ask whether God made the tapeworm. And it is questionable whether an affirmative answer fits in either with what we know about the process of evolution or what many of us believe about the moral perfection of God.

Meg Cabot Foto
Josh Waitzkin Foto
Barack Obama Foto
Walter Cronkite Foto

„I think that our comfort is in our history.“

—  Walter Cronkite American broadcast journalist 1916 - 2009

Free the Airwaves! (2002)

John Gray Foto
Barack Obama Foto
Dan Quayle Foto
Teal Swan Foto

Ähnliche Themen