„The battle was over. Our casualties were some thirteen thousand killed--thirteen thousand minds, memories, loves, sensations, worlds, universes--because the human mind is more a universe than the universe itself--and all for a few hundred yards of useless mud.“

—  John Fowles, buch Daniel Martin

Daniel Martin (1977)

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
John Fowles Foto
John Fowles
britischer Romanautor 1926 - 2005

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Augustin Louis Cauchy Foto

„As translated by Julio Antonio Gonzalo (2008). The Intelligible Universe: An Overview of the Last Thirteen Billion Years.“

—  Augustin Louis Cauchy French mathematician (1789–1857) 1789 - 1857

World Scientific. p. 301.
Augustin-Louis Cauchy (1850). Considérations sur les ordres religieux adressées aux amis des sciences. Pommeret et Moreau. p. 26.
Original: Je suis catholique sincère comme l’ont été Corneille, Racine, La Bruyère, Bossuet, Bourdaloue, Fénelon ; comme l’ont été et le sont encore un grand nombre des hommes les plus distingués de notre époque, de ceux qui ont fait le plus d’honneur à la science, à la philosophie, à la littérature, qui ont le plus illustré nos académies. Je partage les convictions profondes qu'ont manifestées par leurs paroles, par leurs actions et par leurs écrits tant de savants de premier ordre , les Rutfini, les Haûy, les Laennec, les Ampère, les Pelletier, les Freycinet, les Coriolis; et si j'évite de nommer ceux qui restent, de peur de blesser leur modestie, je puis dire du moins que j'aimais à retrouver toute la noblesse, toute la générosité de la foi chrétienne dans mes illustres amis, dans le créateur de la cristallographie (le chanoine Haùy), dans le navigateur célèbre que porta l'Uranie (Claude-Marie de Freycinet), et dans l'immortel auteur de l'électricité dynamique (André-Marie Ampère)

Swami Vivekananda Foto
Thomas Hood Foto
Guy De Maupassant Foto
Éric Pichet Foto
David Irving Foto

„There should be a Kettle's Yard in every university.“

—  Jim Ede art collector 1895 - 1990

From Introduction to the Handlist 1970

Charles Fort Foto

„If there is a universal mind, must it be sane?“

—  Charles Fort American writer 1874 - 1932

This has become widely attributed to Fort, but originates with Damon Knight, who in Charles Fort : Prophet of the Unexplained (1970) used the expression to sum up the nature of some of Fort's ideas or inquiries.
Misattributed

Sinclair Lewis Foto
Clive Staples Lewis Foto

„But not all the cords were individuals: some of them were universal truths or universal qualities.“

—  Clive Staples Lewis, buch Perelandra

Perelandra (1943)
Kontext: And now, by a transition which he did not notice, it seemed that what had begun as speech was turned into sight, or into something that can be remembered only as if it were seeing. He thought he saw the Great Dance. It seemed to be woven out of the intertwining undulation of many cords or bands of light, leaping over and under one another and mutually embraced in arabesques and flower-like subtleties. Each figure as he looked at it became the master-figure or focus of the whole spectacle, by means of which his eye disentangled all else and brought it into unity — only to be itself entangled when he looked to what he had taken for mere marginal decorations and found that there also the same hegemony was claimed, and the claim made good, yet the former pattern thereby disposed but finding in its new subordination a significance greater than that which it had abdicated. He could see also (but the word "seeing" is now plainly inadequate) wherever the ribbons or serpents of light intersected minute corpuscles of momentary brightness: and he knew somehow that these particles were the secular generalities of which history tells — people, institutions, climates of opinion, civilizations, arts, sciences and the like — ephemeral coruscations that piped their short song and vanished. The ribbons or cords themselves, in which millions of corpuscles lived and died, were the things of some different kind. At first he could not say what. But he knew in the end that most of them were individual entities. If so, the time in which the Great Dance proceeds is very unlike time as we know it. Some of the thinner more delicate cords were the beings that we call short lived: flowers and insects, a fruit or a storm of rain, and once (he thought) a wave of the sea. Others were such things we think lasting: crystals, rivers, mountains, or even stars. Far above these in girth and luminosity and flashing with colours form beyond our spectrum were the lines of personal beings, yet as different from one another in splendour as all of them from the previous class. But not all the cords were individuals: some of them were universal truths or universal qualities. It did not surprise him then to find that these and the persons were both cords and both stood together as against the mere atoms of generality which lived and died in the clashing of their streams: But afterwards, when he came back to earth, he wondered. And by now the thing must have passed together out of the region of sight as we understand it. For he says that the whole figure of these enamored and inter-inanimate circlings was suddenly revealed as the mere superficies of a far vaster pattern in four dimensions, and that figure as the boundary of yet others in other worlds: till suddenly as the movement grew yet swifter, the interweaving yet more ecstatic, the relevance of all to all yet more intense, as dimension was added to dimension and that part of him which could reason and remember was dropped further and further behind that part of him which saw, even then, at the very zenith of complexity, complexity was eaten up and faded, as a thin white cloud fades into the hard blue burning of sky, and all simplicity beyond all comprehension, ancient and young as spring, illimitable, pellucid, drew him with cords of infinite desire into its own stillness. He went up into such a quietness, a privacy, and a freshness that at the very moment when he stood farthest from our ordinary mode of being he had the sense of stripping off encumbrances and awaking from a trance, and coming to himself. With a gesture of relaxation he looked about him…

„Universities are turning out thousands of reporters. They are quite bright and they don't have to rhyme.“

—  Mighty Sparrow Grenadian musician 1935

Kurlansky, Mark. 1992. A Continent of Islands: Searching for the Caribbean Destiny. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0-201-52396-5, p. 121.

Arthur Stanley Eddington Foto
Paul Davies Foto
Václav Havel Foto

„This awareness endows us with the capacity for self-transcendence. Politicians at international forums may reiterate a thousand times that the basis of the new world order must be universal respect for human rights, but it will mean nothing as long as this imperative does not derive from the respect of the miracle of Being, the miracle of the universe, the miracle of nature, the miracle of our own existence.“

—  Václav Havel playwright, essayist, poet, dissident and 1st President of the Czech Republic 1936 - 2011

The Need for Transcendence in the Postmodern World (1994)
Kontext: A modern philosopher once said: "Only a God can save us now."
Yes, the only real hope of people today is probably a renewal of our certainty that we are rooted in the earth and, at the same time, in the cosmos. This awareness endows us with the capacity for self-transcendence. Politicians at international forums may reiterate a thousand times that the basis of the new world order must be universal respect for human rights, but it will mean nothing as long as this imperative does not derive from the respect of the miracle of Being, the miracle of the universe, the miracle of nature, the miracle of our own existence. Only someone who submits to the authority of the universal order and of creation, who values the right to be a part of it and a participant in it, can genuinely value himself and his neighbors, and thus honor their rights as well.

Camille Paglia Foto

„When hurt feelings and bruised egos are more important than the unfettered life of the mind, the universities have committed suicide.“

—  Camille Paglia American writer 1947

Quelle: Vamps and Tramps (1994), "No Law in the Arena: A Pagan Theory of Sexuality", p. 51
Kontext: Campus speech codes, that folly of the navel-gazing left, have increased the appeal of the right. Ideas must confront ideas. When hurt feelings and bruised egos are more important than the unfettered life of the mind, the universities have committed suicide.

Zhuangzi Foto
Diana Gabaldon Foto
Vernor Vinge Foto
Wayne W. Dyer Foto
Michael Ende Foto

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