„Whereas reasons may, and usually do, figure among the proximate causes of belief, and thus play a part in both kinds of series (cognitive and causal), it is always possible to trace back the causal series to a point where every trace of rationality vanishes; where we are left face to face with conditions of beliefs social, physiological, and physical— which, considered in themselves, are quite a-logical in their character. /…/ on any merely naturalistic hypothesis, the rational elements in the causal series lie always on the surface. Penetrate but a short way down, and they are found no more.“

Theism and humanism

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Arthur Balfour Foto
Arthur Balfour
britischer Politiker; Premierminister (1902–1905) und Außen… 1848 - 1930

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Herbert A. Simon Foto
Brian Leiter Foto
Bernhard Riemann Foto
Bernhard Riemann Foto
Ragnar Frisch Foto

„In the last decade's intensive study of all sorts of social and economic time series, it has become clear, it seems to me, that the usual time series technique is not quite adequate for the purpose which the social investigator is pursuing… We want to find out on more or less empirical grounds what is actually present in the series at hand, that is to say, what sort of components the series contains.“

—  Ragnar Frisch Norwegian economist 1895 - 1973

Ragnar Frisch, " A method of decomposing an empirical series into its cyclical and progressive components http://www.sv.uio.no/econ/om/tall-og-fakta/nobelprisvinnere/ragnar-frisch/published-scientific-work/rf-published-scientific-works/rf1931e.pdf." Journal of the American Statistical Association 26.173A (1931): 73-78.
1930s

Paul Dirac Foto
Willard van Orman Quine Foto

„Implication is thus the very texture of our web of belief, and logic is the theory that traces it.“

—  Willard van Orman Quine American philosopher and logician 1908 - 2000

S. 41
The Web of Belief (1970)

Kapila Foto

„According to Dr. Ambedkar, Kapila is the source of one of Buddhism's most fundamental concepts, causality, and also of the related Buddhist rejection of the belief in a personal Creator of the universe: 'His next tenet related to causality-creation and its cause. Kapila denied the theory that there was a being who created the universe.“

—  Kapila Vedic sage, of the Samkhya school of Hindu philosophy

Quoted from Elst, Koenraad (2002). Who is a Hindu?: Hindu revivalist views of Animism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and other offshoots of Hinduism. ISBN 978-8185990743, with quote from Ambedkar: The Buddha and his Dhamma, 1:5:2.

Roberto Mangabeira Unger Foto
Philip K. Dick Foto
Carl Schmitt Foto
C.G. Jung Foto

„We Shall Naturally look round in vain the macrophysical world for acausal events, for the simple reason that we cannot imagine events that are connected non-causally and are capable of a non-causal explanation. But that does not mean that such events do not exist.“

—  C.G. Jung, buch Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle

Quelle: Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle (1960), p. 5
Kontext: We Shall Naturally look round in vain the macrophysical world for acausal events, for the simple reason that we cannot imagine events that are connected non-causally and are capable of a non-causal explanation. But that does not mean that such events do not exist... The so-called "scientific view of the world" based on this can hardly be anything more than a psychologically biased partial view which misses out all those by no means unimportant aspects that cannot be grasped statistically.

Hans Reichenbach Foto
Augustus De Morgan Foto

„When… we have a series of values of a quantity which continually diminish, and in such a way, that name any quantity we may, however small, all the values, after a certain value, are severally less than that quantity, then the symbol by which the values are denoted is said to diminish without limit. And if the series of values increase in succession, so that name any quantity we may, however great, all after a certain point will be greater, then the series is said to increase without limit.“

—  Augustus De Morgan British mathematician, philosopher and university teacher (1806-1871) 1806 - 1871

It is also frequently said, when a quantity diminishes without limit, that it has nothing, zero or 0, for its limit: and that when it increases without limit it has infinity or ∞ or 1⁄0 for its limit.
The Differential and Integral Calculus (1836)

Gottfried Leibniz Foto

„We never have a full demonstration, although there is always an underlying reason for the truth, even if it is only perfectly understood by God, who alone penetrated the infinite series in one stroke of the mind.“

—  Gottfried Leibniz German mathematician and philosopher 1646 - 1716

The Shorter Leibniz Texts (2006) http://books.google.com/books?id=oFoCY3xJ8nkC&dq edited by Lloyd H. Strickland, p. 111

„The aim [of positivism in organization studies] is to reveal causal regularities that underlie surface reality.“

—  Lex Donaldson British-Australian organizational sociologist 1947

Lex Donaldson (2003; 41), as cited in: Walter R. Nord, ‎Ann F. Connell (2012). Rethinking the Knowledge Controversy in Organization Studies. p. 150.

Taraneh Javanbakht Foto
Rudolf Rocker Foto

„All social phenomena are the result of a series of various causes, in most cases so inwardly related that it is quite impossible clearly to separate one from the other. We are always dealing with the interplay of various causes which, as a rule, can be clearly recognised but cannot be calculated according to scientific methods.“

—  Rudolf Rocker, buch Nationalism and Culture

Quelle: Nationalism and Culture (1937), Ch. 1 "The Insufficiency of Economic Materialism"
Kontext: No thinking man in this day can fail to recognise that one cannot properly evaluate an historical period without considering economic conditions. But much more one-sided is the view which maintains that all history is merely the result of economic conditions, under whose influence all other life phenomena have received form and imprint.
There are thousands of events in history which cannot be explained by purely economic reasons, or by them alone. It is quite possible to bring everything within the terms of a definite scheme, but the result is usually not worth the effort. There is scarcely an historical event to whose shaping economic causes have not contributed, but economic forces are not the only motive powers which have set everything else in motion. All social phenomena are the result of a series of various causes, in most cases so inwardly related that it is quite impossible clearly to separate one from the other. We are always dealing with the interplay of various causes which, as a rule, can be clearly recognised but cannot be calculated according to scientific methods.

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