„One may well wonder at the short-sightedness of those who ignore the characteristics which so clearly distinguish different things and declare that the laws of Solon and Lycurgus are all-sufficient to secure the greatest of republics, Athens and Sparta, because their sovereign authority is loyally accepted by those who enjoy that citizenship, yet deny that right reason, which is the fountain head of all other law, can impart freedom to the wise, who obey all that it prescribes or forbids.“

47.
Every Good Man is Free

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Philo von Alexandria Foto
Philo von Alexandria1
Philosoph der Antike -15 - 45 v.Chr

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Edmund Burke Foto

„In a state of nature, it is an invariable law, that a man's acquisitions are in proportion to his labours. In a state of artificial society, it is a law as constant and as invariable, that those who labour most enjoy the fewest things; and that those who labour not at all have the greatest number of enjoyments.“

—  Edmund Burke, buch A Vindication of Natural Society

A Vindication of Natural Society (1756)
Kontext: The most obvious division of society is into rich and poor; and it is no less obvious, that the number of the former bear a great disproportion to those of the latter. The whole business of the poor is to administer to the idleness, folly, and luxury of the rich; and that of the rich, in return, is to find the best methods of confirming the slavery and increasing the burdens of the poor. In a state of nature, it is an invariable law, that a man's acquisitions are in proportion to his labours. In a state of artificial society, it is a law as constant and as invariable, that those who labour most enjoy the fewest things; and that those who labour not at all have the greatest number of enjoyments. A constitution of things this, strange and ridiculous beyond expression! We scarce believe a thing when we are told it, which we actually see before our eyes every day without being in the least surprised.

Mohammad Ali Foroughi Foto
Lyndon B. Johnson Foto
Mahatma Gandhi Foto

„We are less than atoms, I say, because the atom obeys the law of its being, whereas we in the insolence of our ignorance deny the law of nature. But I have no argument to address to those who have no faith.“

—  Mahatma Gandhi pre-eminent leader of Indian nationalism during British-ruled India 1869 - 1948

Young India (24 September 1931); also in Teachings Of Mahatma Gandhi (1945), edited by Jag Parvesh Chander, p. 458 archive.org https://archive.org/stream/teachingsofmahat029222mbp#page/n463/mode/2up
1930s
Kontext: It is beyond my power to induce in you a belief in God. There are certain things which are self proved and certain which are not proved at all. The existence of God is like a geometrical axiom. It may be beyond our heart grasp. I shall not talk of an intellectual grasp. Intellectual attempts are more or less failures, as a rational explanation cannot give you the faith in a living God. For it is a thing beyond the grasp of reason. It transcends reason. There are numerous phenomena from which you can reason out the existence of God, but I shall not insult your intelligence by offering you a rational explanation of that type. I would have you brush aside all rational explanations and begin with a simple childlike faith in God. If I exist, God exists. With me it is a necessity of my being as it is with millions. They may not be able to talk about it, but from their life you can see that it is a part of their life. I am only asking you to restore the belief that has been undermined. In order to do so, you have to unlearn a lot of literature that dazzles your intelligence and throws you off your feet. Start with the faith which is also a token of humility and an admission that we know nothing, that we are less than atoms in this universe. We are less than atoms, I say, because the atom obeys the law of its being, whereas we in the insolence of our ignorance deny the law of nature. But I have no argument to address to those who have no faith.

„For those who have only to obey, law is what the sovereign commands. For the sovereign, in the throes of deciding what he ought to command, this view of law is singularly empty of light and leading.“

—  William Ernest Hocking American philosopher 1873 - 1966

Preface (20 May 1926), p. vii.
Present Status of the Philosophy of Law and of Rights (1926)
Kontext: For those who have only to obey, law is what the sovereign commands. For the sovereign, in the throes of deciding what he ought to command, this view of law is singularly empty of light and leading. In the dispersed sovereignty of modern states, and especially in times of rapid social change, law must look to the future as well as to history and precedent, and to what is possible and right as well as to what is actual.

Aldo Capitini Foto
Lyndon B. Johnson Foto
Calvin Coolidge Foto
Georg Christoph Lichtenberg Foto

„Actual aristocracy cannot be abolished by any law: all the law can do is decree how it is to be imparted and who is to acquire it.“

—  Georg Christoph Lichtenberg German scientist, satirist 1742 - 1799

L 44
Aphorisms (1765-1799), Notebook L (1793-1796)

„This power of attention is that which perhaps more than any thing else distinguishes those who do great things from those who can do nothing well.“

—  George Long English classical scholar 1800 - 1879

An Old Man's Thoughts on Many Things, Of Education I

„There are times when the law jeopardizes those who obey it.“

—  Kathy Acker American novelist, playwright, essayist, and poet 1947 - 1997

Quelle: Pussy, King of the Pirates

Arun Shourie Foto
Kenan Evren Foto

„All freedoms provided by democracy are for those who believe in it. Can the rights and freedoms of millions of virtuous people who believe in democracy be safeguarded if those who seek to destroy it abuse rights and freedoms to achieve their goals?“

—  Kenan Evren Turkish general 1917 - 2015

An Uneasy Honeymoon, Time. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,952783-2,00.html (Sep. 29, 1980)
Said Evren in defense of the decision to take power after the 1980 military coup.

Johann Gottlieb Fichte Foto

„The fundamental maxim of those who stand at the head of this Age, and therefore the principle of the Age, is this,—to accept nothing as really existing or obligatory, but that which they can understand and clearly comprehend.“

—  Johann Gottlieb Fichte German philosopher 1762 - 1814

With regard to this fundamental principle, as we have now declared and adopted it without farther definition or limitation, this third Age is precisely similar to that which is to follow it, the fourth, or age of Reason as Science,—and by virtue of this similarity prepares the way for it. Before the tribunal of Science, too, nothing is accepted but the Conceivable. Only in the application of the principle there is this difference between the two Ages,—that the third, which we shall shortly name that of Empty Freedom, makes its fixed and previously acquired conceptions the measure of existence; while the fourth—that of Science—on the contrary, makes existence the measure, not of its acquired, but of its desiderated beliefs.
Quelle: The Characteristics of the Present Age (1806), p. 19

Margaret Thatcher Foto
Jean Anouilh Foto
Scott Ritter Foto
Bertolt Brecht Foto

„The law is simply and solely made for the exploitation of those who do not understand it or of those who, for naked need, cannot obey it.“

—  Bertolt Brecht, Die Dreigroschenoper

Polly Peachum, in Act 3, scene 1, p. 74
Variant translation: The law was made for one thing alone, for the exploitation of those who don't understand it, or are prevented by naked misery from obeying it.
The Threepenny Opera (1928)

Keir Hardie Foto
Emil M. Cioran Foto

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