„Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs
Receive our air, that moment they are free!
They touch our country, and their shackles fall.“

—  William Cowper, The Task

Quelle: The Task (1785), Book II, The Timepiece, Line 40.

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
William Cowper Foto
William Cowper
englischer Dichter 1731 - 1800

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Franklin D. Roosevelt Foto

„The forests are the "lungs" of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.“

—  Franklin D. Roosevelt 32nd President of the United States 1882 - 1945

1930s
Kontext: Forests require many years to mature; consequently the long point of view is necessary if the forests are to be maintained for the good of our country. He who would hold this long point of view must realize the need of subordinating immediate profits for the sake of the future public welfare. … A forest is not solely so many thousand board feet of lumber to be logged when market conditions make it profitable. It is an integral part of our natural land covering, and the most potent factor in maintaining Nature's delicate balance in the organic and inorganic worlds. In his struggle for selfish gain, man has often needlessly tipped the scales so that Nature's balance has been destroyed, and the public welfare has usually been on the short-weighted side. Such public necessities, therefore, must not be destroyed because there is profit for someone in their destruction. The preservation of the forests must be lifted above mere dollars and cents considerations. … The handling of our forests as a continuous, renewable resource means permanent employment and stability to our country life.
The forests are also needed for mitigating extreme climatic fluctuations, holding the soil on the slopes, retaining the moisture in the ground, and controlling the equable flow of water in our streams. The forests are the "lungs" of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people. Truly, they make the country more livable.
There is a new awakening to the importance of the forests to the country, and if you foresters remain true to your ideals, the country may confidently trust its most precious heritage to your safe-keeping.

Novalis Foto

„There's so much pollution in the air now that if it weren't for our lungs, there'd be no place to put it all.“

—  Robert Orben American magician and writer 1928

Reported in Robert Krier (January 31, 2008) "Waiting to Inhale: Don't take a breath without the report from our Air Pollution Control District", The San Diego Union-Tribune, p. E-1.
Attributed

Samuel R. Delany Foto
Robert A. Heinlein Foto
Russell Brand Foto
Oscar Wilde Foto

„For one moment our lives met, our souls touched.“

—  Oscar Wilde Irish writer and poet 1854 - 1900

Variante: For one moment our lives met our souls touched.

Anaximenes of Miletus Foto

„Just as our soul, being air, constrains us, so breath and air envelops the whole kosmos.“

—  Anaximenes of Miletus Ancient Greek Pre-Socratic philosopher -585 - -525 v.Chr

DK 13B2
Original: (el) οἷον ἡ ψυχή ἡ ἡμετέρα ἀὴρ οὖσα συγκρατεῖ ἡμᾶς, καὶ ὅλον τὸν κόσμον πνεῦμα καὶ ἀὴρ περιέχει

Mary E. Pearson Foto
Nick Flynn Foto
Mwanandeke Kindembo Foto
José Ortega Y Gasset Foto

„With more vital freedom than ever, we feel that we cannot breathe the air within our nations, because it is confined air. What was before a nation open to all the winds of heaven, has turned into something provincial, an enclosing space.“

—  José Ortega Y Gasset, buch Der Aufstand der Massen

Quelle: The Revolt of the Masses (1929), Chapter XIV: Who Rules The World?
Kontext: No one knows toward what center human things are going to gravitate in the near future, and hence the life of the world has become scandalously provisional. Everything that today is done in public and in private — even in one's inner conscience — is provisional, the only exception being certain portions of certain sciences. He will be a wise man who puts no trust in all that is proclaimed, upheld, essayed, and lauded at the present day. All that will disappear as quickly as it came. All of it, from the mania for physical sports (the mania, not the sports themselves) to political violence; from "new art" to sun-baths at idiotic fashionable watering-places. Nothing of all that has any roots; it is all pure invention, in the bad sense of the word, which makes it equivalent to fickle caprice. It is not a creation based on the solid substratum of life; it is not a genuine impulse or need. In a word, from the point of view of life it is false.
We are in presence of the contradiction of a style of living which cultivates sincerity and is at the same time a fraud. There is truth only in an existence which feels its acts as irrevocably necessary. There exists today no politician who feels the inevitableness of his policy, and the more extreme his attitudes, the more frivolous, the less inspired by destiny they are. The only life with its roots fixed in earth, the only autochthonous life, is that which is made of inevitable acts. All the rest, all that it is in our power to take or to leave or to exchange for something else, is mere falsification of life. Life today is the fruit of an interregnum, of an empty space between two organizations of historical rule — that which was, that which is to be. For this reason it is essentially provisional. Men do not know what institutions to serve in truth; women do not know what type of men they in truth prefer.
The European cannot live unless embarked upon some great unifying enterprise. When this is lacking, he becomes degraded, grows slack, his soul is paralyzed. We have a commencement of this before our eyes today. The groups which up to today have been known as nations arrived about a century ago at their highest point of expansion. Nothing more can be done with them except lead them to a higher evolution. They are now mere past accumulating all around Europe, weighing it down, imprisoning it. With more vital freedom than ever, we feel that we cannot breathe the air within our nations, because it is confined air. What was before a nation open to all the winds of heaven, has turned into something provincial, an enclosing space.

Corneliu Zelea Codreanu Foto
John Wycliffe Foto

„Already a third and more of England is in the hands of the Pope. There cannot be two temporal sovereigns in one country; either Edward is King or Urban is king. We make our choice. We accept Edward of England and refute Urban of Rome.“

—  John Wycliffe English theologian and early dissident in the Roman Catholic Church

Quoted in William Tyndale: If God Spare My Life — Martyrdom, Betrayal and the English Bible (2003) by Brian Moynahan, p. xvii

Jacob Bronowski Foto
Miranda July Foto
Leon Trotsky Foto

„A slave-owner who through cunning and violence shackles a slave in chains, and a slave who through cunning or violence breaks the chains“

—  Leon Trotsky Marxist revolutionary from Russia 1879 - 1940

Their Morals and Ours (1938)
Kontext: (On the American Civil War) "History has different yardsticks for the cruelty of the Northerners and the cruelty of the Southerners in the Civil War. A slave-owner who through cunning and violence shackles a slave in chains, and a slave who through cunning or violence breaks the chains – let not the contemptible eunuchs tell us that they are equals before a court of morality!"

Benjamin Franklin King, Jr. Foto

„Nothing to breathe but air
Quick as a flash 'tis gone;
Nowhere to fall but off,
Nowhere to stand but on.“

—  Benjamin Franklin King, Jr. American humorist and poet 1857 - 1894

"The Pessimist," http://books.google.com/books?id=nfUaAAAAYAAJ&q=%22Nothing+to+breathe+but+air+Quick+as+a+flash%22+%22gone+Nowhere+to+fall+but+off+Nowhere+to+stand+but+on%22&pg=PA225#v=onepage first published as "The Sum of Life" in the Chicago Mail, c. January 1893 http://books.google.com/books?id=RCgTAAAAYAAJ&q=%22Nothing+to+breathe+but+air+Quick+as+a+flash+tis+gone+Nowhere+to+fall+but+off+Nowhere+to+stand+but+on%22&pg=PA48#v=onepage.

„By our rules we cannot receive a letter from a friend.“

—  Sir John Bayley, 1st Baronet British judge 1763 - 1841

1 St. Tr. (N. S.) 515.
King v. Knowles (1820)

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