„Humanity may endure the loss of everything: all its possessions may be torn away without infringing its true dignity; — all but the possibility of improvement.“

—  Johann Gottlieb Fichte, "The Vocation of the Scholar" (1794), as translated by William Smith, in The Popular Works of Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1889), Vol. I, Lecture IV, p. 188.
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deutscher Philosoph 1762 - 1814
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„It may be argued that the past is a country from which we have all emigrated, that its loss is part of our common humanity.“

—  Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
Context: It may be argued that the past is a country from which we have all emigrated, that its loss is part of our common humanity. Which seems to be self-evidently true; but I suggest that the writer who is out-of-country and even out-of-language may experience this loss in an intensified form. It is made more concrete for him by the physical fact of discontinuity, of his present being in a different place from his past, of his being "elsewhere"… human beings do not perceive things whole; we are not gods but wounded creatures, cracked lenses, capably only of fractured perceptions. Partial beings, in all the senses of that phrase. Meaning is a shaky edifice we build out of scraps, dogmas, childhood injuries, newspaper articles, chance remarks, old films, small victories, people hated, people loved; perhaps it is because of our sense of what is the case is constructed from such inadequate materials that we defend it so fiercely, even to the death. "Imaginary Homelands (1992)

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„True devotion will rather ask to be allowed to give, and will count as loss all which may not be given up for the Lord’s sake.“

—  James Hudson Taylor Missionary in China 1832 - 1905
(J. Hudson Taylor. Union and Communion: Or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 68).

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„Mass migration is like a slow and steady current of water which washes away the shore. It appears in the guise of humanitarian action, but its true nature is the occupation of territory; and their gain in territory is our loss of territory.“

—  Viktor Orbán Hungarian politician, chairman of Fidesz 1963
Budapest speech http://www.kormany.hu/en/the-prime-minister/the-prime-minister-s-speeches/speech-by-prime-minister-viktor-orban-on-15-march, 15 March 2016

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„Loss is not without its curious advantages for the artist. Major traumatic breaks are pretty common in the biographies of artists I respect.“

—  William Gibson American-Canadian speculative fiction novelist and founder of the cyberpunk subgenre 1948
Interview in The New York Times Magazine (19 August 2007)

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„The loss of wealth is loss of dirt,
As sages in all times assert;
The happy man's without a shirt.“

—  John Heywood English writer known for plays, poems and a collection of proverbs 1497 - 1580
Be Merry Friends; reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

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„Is it inconceivable that intense thought concentrated toward a sensitive with whom the thinker is in close sympathy may induce a telepathic chain of brain waves, along which the message of thought can go straight to its goal without loss of energy due to distance?“

—  William Crookes British chemist and physicist 1832 - 1919
Context: It may be objected that brain waves, like any other waves, must obey physical laws. Therefore, transmission of thought must be easier or more certain the nearer the agent and recipient are to each other, and should die out altogether before great distances are reached. Also it can be urged that if brain waves diffuse in all directions they should affect all sensitives within their radius of action, instead of impressing only one brain. The electric telegraph is not a parallel case, for there a material wire intervenes to conduct and guide the energy to its destination. These are weighty objections, but not, I think, insurmountable. Far be it from me to say anything disrespectful of the law of inverse squares, but I have already endeavored to show we are dealing with conditions removed from our material and limited conceptions of space, matter, form. Is it inconceivable that intense thought concentrated toward a sensitive with whom the thinker is in close sympathy may induce a telepathic chain of brain waves, along which the message of thought can go straight to its goal without loss of energy due to distance? And is it also inconceivable that our mundane ideas of space and distance may be superseded in these subtle regions of unsubstantial thought, where "near" and "far" may lose their usual meaning?

„[The loss- of-strength gradient is] the degree to which military and political power diminishes as we move a unit distance away from its home base.“

—  Kenneth E. Boulding British-American economist 1910 - 1993
p. 245 According to Marike Finlay (1987) Powermatics: A Discursive Critique of New Technology. p. 200 with this statement "Kenneth Boulding has shown, the extent of control is a function of loss-of-strength gradient of a political centre."

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