„Fascism recognizes the real needs which gave rise to socialism and trade unionism, giving them due weight in the guild or corporative system in which divergent interests are coordinated and harmonized in the unity of the State.“

“The Doctrine of Fascism” (1935 version), Firenze: Vallecchi Editore, p. 15
1930s

Übernommen aus Wikiquote. Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Benito Mussolini Foto
Benito Mussolini5
italienischer Politiker und Ministerpräsident des Königreic… 1883 - 1945

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„The social system tends to be dominated by images… especially of the future, which act cybernetically, constantly guided by perceived divergences between the real and the ideal“

—  Kenneth E. Boulding British-American economist 1910 - 1993

Quelle: 1970s, Toward a General Social Science, 1974, p. vii as cited by Debora Hammond (1995) "Perspectives from the Boulding files". In: Systems Research Vol. 12 No. 4, p. 281-290

Peter Kropotkin Foto

„We know well the means by which this association of the lord, priest, merchant, judge, soldier, and king founded its domination. It was by the annihilation of all free unions: of village communities, guilds, trades unions, fraternities, and mediæval cities.“

—  Peter Kropotkin Russian zoologist, evolutionary theorist, philosopher, scientist, revolutionary, economist, activist, geographer, writer 1842 - 1921

Anarchism: Its Philosophy and Ideal (1896)
Kontext: We know well the means by which this association of the lord, priest, merchant, judge, soldier, and king founded its domination. It was by the annihilation of all free unions: of village communities, guilds, trades unions, fraternities, and mediæval cities. It was by confiscating the land of the communes and the riches of the guilds; it was by the absolute and ferocious prohibition of all kinds of free agreement between men; it was by massacre, the wheel, the gibbet, the sword, and the fire that Church and State established their domination, and that they succeeded henceforth to reign over an incoherent agglomeration of subjects, who had no direct union more among themselves.
It is now hardly thirty or forty years ago that we began to reconquer, by struggle, by revolt, the first steps of the right of association, that was freely practised by the artisans and the tillers of the soil through the whole of the middle ages.
And, already now, Europe is covered by thousands of voluntary associations for study and teaching, for industry, commerce, science, art, literature, exploitation, resistance to exploitation, amusement, serious work, gratification and self-denial, for all that makes up the life of an active and thinking being. We see these societies rising in all nooks and corners of all domains: political, economic, artistic, intellectual. Some are as shortlived as roses, some hold their own since several decades, and all strive — while maintaining the independence of each group, circle, branch, or section — to federate, to unite, across frontiers as well as among each nation; to cover all the life of civilized men with a net, meshes of which are intersected and interwoven.

Alfredo Rocco Foto
A. James Gregor Foto
Bertrand Russell Foto
John Kenneth Galbraith Foto
Calvin Coolidge Foto
Marcus Aurelius Foto

„Everything harmonizes with me, which is harmonious to thee, O Universe. Nothing for me is too early or too late, which is in due time for thee.“

—  Marcus Aurelius, buch Selbstbetrachtungen

XII, 30
Meditations (c. 121–180 AD), Book XII
Kontext: Everything harmonizes with me, which is harmonious to thee, O Universe. Nothing for me is too early or too late, which is in due time for thee. There is one light of the sun, though it is interrupted by walls, mountains and infinite other things. There is one common substance, though it is distributed among countless bodies which have their several qualities. There is one soul, though it is distributed among several natures and individual limitations. There is one intelligent soul, though it seems to be divided.

Hermann Rauschning Foto
Fidel Castro Foto
Robert Hall Foto
Peter F. Drucker Foto
Theodore Roosevelt Foto

„The great corporations which we have grown to speak of rather loosely as trusts are the creatures of the State, and the State not only has the right to control them wherever need of such control is shown“

—  Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919

1900s, Address at Providence (1901)
Variante: The great corporations which we have grown to speak of rather loosely as trusts are the creatures of the State, and the State not only has the right to control them, but it is duty bound to control them wherever the need of such control is shown.
Kontext: The great corporations which we have grown to speak of rather loosely as trusts are the creatures of the State, and the State not only has the right to control them wherever need of such control is shown… [Applause] The immediate necessity in dealing with trusts is to place them under the real, not the nominal, control of some sovereign to which, as its creatures, the trusts owe allegiance, and in whose courts the sovereign's orders may be enforced. In my opinion, this sovereign must be the National Government.

„Industry shares a need common to every social enterprise from church to guild, municipality to empire, war to university.“

—  Oliver Sheldon British businessman 1894 - 1951

Oliver Sheldon. Philosophy of Management. London: Isaac Pitman and Sons; 1930, p. 33. As cited in Albert Lepawsky (1949), Administration, p. 8

Zeev Sternhell Foto
Chris Hedges Foto

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