„We are now in a position to prove the following propositions : —
1. The distance of the sun from the earth is greater than eighteen times, but less than twenty times, the distance of the moon (from the earth); this follows from the hypothesis about the halved moon.
2. The diameter of the sun has the same ratio (as aforesaid) to the diameter of the moon.
3. The diameter of the sun has to the diameter of the earth a ratio greater than that which 19 has to 3, but less than that which 43 has to 6; this follows from the ratio thus discovered between the distances, the hypothesis about the shadow, and the hypothesis that the moon subtends one fifteenth part of a sign of the zodiac.“

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)

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Aristarchos von Samos Foto
Aristarchos von Samos
griechischer Astronom, Vertreter des heliozentrischen Weltb…

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Aristarchus of Samos Foto

„Proposition 15. The diameter of the sun has, to the diameter of the earth a ratio greater than that which 19 has to 3, but less than that which 43 has to 6.“

—  Aristarchus of Samos ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)
Variante: Proposition 10. The sun has to the moon a ratio greater than that which 5832 has to 1, but less than that which 8000 has to 1.

Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto

„Proposition 9. The diameter of the sun is greater than 18 times, but less than 20 times, the diameter of the moon.“

—  Aristarchus of Samos ancient Greek astronomer and mathematician

p, 125
On the Sizes and Distances of the Sun and the Moon (c. 250 BC)
Variante: Proposition 7. The distance of the sun from the earth is greater than eighteen times, but less than twenty times, the distance of the moon from the earth.

Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Thomas Robert Malthus Foto

„The moon is not kept in her orbit round the earth, nor the earth in her orbit round the sun, by a force that varies merely in the inverse ratio of the squares of the distances.“

—  Thomas Robert Malthus British political economist 1766 - 1834

Quelle: An Essay on The Principle of Population (First Edition 1798, unrevised), Chapter XIII, paragraph 2, lines 19-22

James Bradley Foto

„If we suppose the distance of the fixed stars from the sun to be so great that the diameter of the earth's orbit viewed from them would not subtend a sensible angle, or which amounts to the same, that their annual parallax is quite insensible; it will then follow that a line drawn from the earth in any part of its orbit to a fixed star, will always, as to sense, make the same angle with the plane of the ecliptic, and the place of the star, as seen from the earth, would be the same as seen from the sun placed in the focus of the ellipsis described by the earth in its annual revolution, which place may therefore be called its true or real place.
But if we further suppose that the velocity of the earth in its orbit bears any sensible proportion to the velocity with which light is propagated, it will thence follow that the fixed stars (though removed too far off to be subject to a parallax on account of distance) will nevertheless be liable to an aberration, or a kind of parallax, on account of the relative velocity between light and the earth in its annual motion.
For if we conceive, as before, the true place of any star to be that in which it would appear viewed from the sun, the visible place to a spectator moving along with the earth, will be always different from its true, the star perpetually appearing out of its true place more or less, according as the velocity of the earth in its orbit is greater or less; so that when the earth is in its perihelion, the star will appear farthest distant from its true place, and nearest to it when the earth is in its aphelion; and the apparent distance in the former case will be to that in the latter in the reciprocal proportion of the distances of the earth in its perihelion and its aphelion. When the earth is in any other part of its orbit, its velocity being always in the reciprocal proportion of the perpendicular let fall from the sun to the tangent of the ellipse at that point where the earth is, or in the direct proportion of the perpendicular let fall upon the same tangent from the other focus, it thence follows that the apparent distance of a star from its true place, will be always as the perpendicular let fall from the upper focus upon the tangent of the ellipse. And hence it will be found likewise, that (supposing a plane passing through the star parallel to the earth's orbit) the locus or visible place of the star on that plane will always be in the circumference of a circle, its true place being in that diameter of it which is parallel to the shorter axis of the earth's orbit, in a point that divides that diameter into two parts, bearing the same proportion to each other, as the greatest and least distances of the earth from the sun.“

—  James Bradley English astronomer; Astronomer Royal 1693 - 1762

Miscellaneous Works and Correspondence (1832), Demonstration of the Rules relating to the Apparent Motion of the Fixed Stars upon account of the Motion of Light.

Aristarchus of Samos Foto
Aristarchus of Samos Foto
John Dee Foto
Johannes Kepler Foto
Isaac Newton Foto

„Bullialdus wrote that all force respecting the Sun as its center & depending on matter must be reciprocally in a duplicate ratio of the distance from the center.“

—  Isaac Newton British physicist and mathematician and founder of modern classical physics 1643 - 1727

Letter to Edmund Halley (June 20, 1686) quoted in I. Bernard Cohen and George E. Smith, ed.s, The Cambridge Companion to Newton (2002) p. 204

A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Foto
Vladimir Nabokov Foto

„Most of the dandelions had changed from suns into moons.“

—  Vladimir Nabokov Russian-American novelist, lepidopterist, professor 1899 - 1977

Roger Ebert Foto

„They’re not talking about faster than the speed of light. Speed has nothing to do with it. The entangled objects somehow communicate instantaneously at a distance. If that is true, distance has no meaning. Light-years have no meaning. Space has no meaning. In a sense, the entangled objects are not even communicating. They are the same thing. At the “quantum level” (and I don’t know what that means), everything may be actually or theoretically linked. All is one. Sun, moon, stars, rain, you, me, everything. All one.“

—  Roger Ebert American film critic, author, journalist, and TV presenter 1942 - 2013

Quelle: Life Itself : A Memoir (2011), Ch. 54 : How I Believe In God
Kontext: Quantum theory is now discussing instantaneous connections between two entangled quantum objects such as electrons. This phenomenon has been observed in laboratory experiments and scientists believe they have proven it takes place. They’re not talking about faster than the speed of light. Speed has nothing to do with it. The entangled objects somehow communicate instantaneously at a distance. If that is true, distance has no meaning. Light-years have no meaning. Space has no meaning. In a sense, the entangled objects are not even communicating. They are the same thing. At the “quantum level” (and I don’t know what that means), everything may be actually or theoretically linked. All is one. Sun, moon, stars, rain, you, me, everything. All one. If this is so, then Buddhism must have been a quantum theory all along. No, I am not a Buddhist. I am not a believer, not an atheist, not an agnostic. I am more content with questions than answers.

Vitruvius Foto

„It is no secret that the moon has no light of her own, but is, as it were, a mirror, receiving brightness from the influence of the sun.“

—  Vitruvius, buch De architectura

Quelle: De architectura (The Ten Books On Architecture) (~ 15BC), Book IX, Chapter II, Sec. 3

A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Foto
Vladimir Nabokov Foto
Robert Grosseteste Foto

„The head is borne towards the heavens and has two lights, as it were the sun and moon.“

—  Robert Grosseteste English bishop and philosopher 1175 - 1253

As quoted by J. J. McEvoy, The philosophy of Robert Grosseteste (1982) p. 372.

A.E. Housman Foto

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