„Beautiful is what we see, More Beautiful is what we know, most Beautiful by far is what we don't.“

quoted by Addison Anderson in a TED-Ed lesson. https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-most-groundbreaking-scientist-you-ve-never-heard-of-addison-anderson

Nicolaus Steno Foto
Nicolaus Steno
dänischer Arzt, Anatom und Geologe 1638 - 1686

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Joseph Joubert Foto
Mo Yan Foto
Ken Wilber Foto

„With science we touch the True, the "It" of Spirit. With morals we touch the Good, the "We" of Spirit. What, then, would an integral approach have to say about the Beautiful, the "I" of Spirit itself? What is the Beauty that is in the eye of the Beholder? When we are in the eye of Spirit, the I of Spirit, what do we finally see?“

—  Ken Wilber American writer and public speaker 1949

The Eye of Spirit : An Integral Vision for a World Gone Slightly Mad (1997)
Kontext: The integral vision, I believe, is more than happy to welcome empirical science as a part — a very important part — of the endeavor to befriend the Kosmos, to be attuned to its many moods and flavors and facets and forms. But a more integral psychology goes beyond that... With science we touch the True, the "It" of Spirit. With morals we touch the Good, the "We" of Spirit. What, then, would an integral approach have to say about the Beautiful, the "I" of Spirit itself? What is the Beauty that is in the eye of the Beholder? When we are in the eye of Spirit, the I of Spirit, what do we finally see?

Yasunari Kawabata Foto

„When we see the beauty of the snow, when we see the beauty of the full moon, when we see the beauty of the cherries in bloom, when in short we brush against and are awakened by the beauty of the four seasons, it is then that we think most of those close to us, and want them to share the pleasure.“

—  Yasunari Kawabata Japanese author, Nobel Prize winner 1899 - 1972

Japan, the Beautiful and Myself (1969)
Kontext: Dr. Yashiro Yukio, internationally known as a scholar of Botticelli, a man of great learning in the art of the past and the present, of the East and the West, has summed up one of the special characteristics of Japanese art in a single poetic sentence: "The time of the snows, of the moon, of the blossoms — then more than ever we think of our comrades." When we see the beauty of the snow, when we see the beauty of the full moon, when we see the beauty of the cherries in bloom, when in short we brush against and are awakened by the beauty of the four seasons, it is then that we think most of those close to us, and want them to share the pleasure. The excitement of beauty calls forth strong fellow feelings, yearnings for companionship, and the word "comrade" can be taken to mean "human being". The snow, the moon, the blossoms, words expressive of the seasons as they move one into another, include in the Japanese tradition the beauty of mountains and rivers and grasses and trees, of all the myriad manifestations of nature, of human feelings as well.

Paul Erdős Foto

„If numbers aren't beautiful, I don't know what is.“

—  Paul Erdős Hungarian mathematician and freelancer 1913 - 1996

Frequent remark, as quoted in My Brain Is Open : The Mathematical Journeys of Paul Erdos (1998) by Bruce Schechter, p. 14

Louis De Bernières Foto
Karel Čapek Foto
Susan Sontag Foto

„What is most beautiful in virile men is something feminine; what is most beautiful in feminine women is something masculine.“

—  Susan Sontag American writer and filmmaker, professor, and activist 1933 - 2004

"Notes on 'Camp'" (1964), note 9, p. 279 http://books.google.com/books?id=e3qgRrVlEH4C&q=%22What+is+most+beautiful+in+virile+men+is+something+feminine+what+is+most+beautiful+in+feminine+women+is+something+masculine%22&pg=PA279#v=onepage; originally published in Partisan Review, Vol. 31 No. 4 http://books.google.com/books?id=qEwqAQAAMAAJ&q=%22What+is+most+beautiful+in+virile+men+is+something+feminine+what+is+most+beautiful+in+feminine+women+is+something+masculine%22&pg=PA519#v=onepage, ( Fall 1964 http://www.bu.edu/partisanreview/books/PR1964V31N4/HTML/#519/z)
Against Interpretation and Other Essays (1966)

Elvis Costello Foto

„What shall we do, what shall we do with all this useless beauty?“

—  Elvis Costello English singer-songwriter 1954

All This Useless Beauty
Song lyrics, All This Useless Beauty (1996)

Don Marquis Foto
Henry Adams Foto

„I know of nothing useful in life except what is beautiful or creates beauty.“

—  Henry Adams journalist, historian, academic, novelist 1838 - 1918

Mr. Wharton in Ch. IV
Esther: A Novel (1884)

Robinson Jeffers Foto

„These are real and we see their beauty.“

—  Robinson Jeffers American poet 1887 - 1962

"The Great Explosion" in the posthumous publication The Beginning and the End (1973)
Kontext: He is no God of love, no justice of a little city like
Dante's Florence, no anthropoid God
Making commandments: this is the God who does not
care and will never cease. Look at the seas there
Flashing against this rock in the darkness — look at the
tide-stream stars — and the fall of nations — and dawn
Wandering with wet white feet down the Carmel Valley
to meet the sea. These are real and we see their beauty.
The great explosion is probably only a metaphor — I know
not — of faceless violence, the root of all things.

Miranda July Foto

„When you can see the beauty of a tree, then you will know what love is.“

—  Miranda July, No One Belongs Here More Than You

Quelle: No One Belongs Here More Than You

Paul Valéry Foto

„What is most beautiful is of necessity tyrannical.“

—  Paul Valéry French poet, essayist, and philosopher 1871 - 1945

Eupalinos quoted by Phaedrus, p. 86
Eupalinos ou l'architecte (1921)

Baruch Spinoza Foto

„Beauty, my dear Sir, is not so much a quality of the object beheld, as an effect in him who beholds it. If our sight were longer or shorter, or if our constitution were different, what now appears beautiful to us would seem misshapen, and what we now think misshapen we should regard as beautiful.“

—  Baruch Spinoza Dutch philosopher 1632 - 1677

Letter to Hugo Boxel (Oct. 1674) The Chief Works of Benedict de Spinoza (1891) Tr. R. H. M. Elwes, Vol. 2, Letter 58 (54).
Kontext: Beauty, my dear Sir, is not so much a quality of the object beheld, as an effect in him who beholds it. If our sight were longer or shorter, or if our constitution were different, what now appears beautiful to us would seem misshapen, and what we now think misshapen we should regard as beautiful. The most beautiful hand seen through the microscope will appear horrible. Some things are beautiful at a distance, but ugly near; thus things regarded in themselves, and in relation to God, are neither ugly nor beautiful. Therefore, he who says that God has created the world, so that it might be beautiful, is bound to adopt one of the two alternatives, either that God created the world for the sake of men's pleasure and eyesight, or else that He created men's pleasure and eyesight for the sake of the world. Now, whether we adopt the former or the latter of these views, how God could have furthered His object by the creation of ghosts, I cannot see. Perfection and imperfection are names which do not differ much from the names beauty and ugliness.<!--p. 382

Andy Warhol Foto
George Santayana Foto

„Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable: what it is or what it means can never be said.“

—  George Santayana, buch The Sense of Beauty

Pt. IV, Expression; § 67: "Conclusion.", p. 267
The Sense of Beauty (1896)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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