„At length the morn and cold indifference came.“

—  Nicholas Rowe, The Fair Penitent

Act i, scene 1. Compare: "But with the morning cool reflection came", Sir Walter Scott, Chronicles of the Canongate, chap. iv. Scott also quotes this in his notes to "The Monastery", chapter iii, note 11; and with "calm" substituted for "cool" in "The Antiquary", chapter v.; and with "repentance" for "reflection" in "Rob Roy", chapter xii.
The Fair Penitent (1703)

Letzte Aktualisierung 22. Mai 2020. Geschichte
Nicholas Rowe Foto
Nicholas Rowe
englischer Beamter, Dichter und Dramatiker 1674 - 1718

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„We went to morning services in variouis places and were deeply impressed by the spiritual poverty of these churches, by the lack of any congregation and the miserable spiritual status of the clergy, the poverty of their sermons, and the nonchalance and indifference of the ritual.“

—  Ingmar Bergman Swedish filmmaker 1918 - 2007

On Winter Light, Jonas Sima interview <!-- pages 173-174 -->
Kontext: We drove about, looking for churches, my father and I. My father, as you probably know, was a clergyman — he knew all the Uppland churches like the back of his hand. We went to morning services in variouis places and were deeply impressed by the spiritual poverty of these churches, by the lack of any congregation and the miserable spiritual status of the clergy, the poverty of their sermons, and the nonchalance and indifference of the ritual.
In one church, I remember — and I think it has a great deal to do with the end of the film — Father and I were sitting together. My father had already been retired for many years, and was old and frail.... Just before the bell begins to toll, we hear a car outside, a shining Volvo: the clergyman climbs out hurriedly, and there is a faint buzz from the vestry, and then the clergyman appears before he ought to — when the bell stops, that is — and says he feels very poorly and that he's talked to the rector and the rector has said he can use an abbrviated form of the service and drop the part at the altar. So there would be just one psalm and a sermon and another psalm. And goes out. Whereon my father, furious, began hammering on the pew, got to his feet and marched out into the vestry, where a long mumbled conversation ensued; after which the churchwarden also went in, then someone ran up the organ gallery to fetch the organist, after which the churchwarden came out and announced that there would be a complete service after all. My father took the service at the altar, but at the beginning and the end.
In some way I feel the end of the play was influenced by my father's intervention — that at all costs one must do what it is one's duty to do, particularly in spiritual contexts. Even if it can seem meaningless.

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„unconcerned but not indifferent“

—  Man Ray American artist and photographer 1890 - 1976

His epitaph, chosen by his widow, Juliet Browner Man Ray, because they were words he'd often said of himself. Quoted in "Man Ray : Master of Imagery; Pioneer Artist and Photographer" by Max Perchick , in PSA Journal (1 May 1991) http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-10728732.html

Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802) Foto

„The opposite of love is not hate. It is indifference.“

—  Christopher Pike American author Kevin Christopher McFadden 1954

Quelle: Black Blood

Paul Valéry Foto

„Politeness is organized indifference.“

—  Paul Valéry French poet, essayist, and philosopher 1871 - 1945

Tel Quel (1943)

William Fitzsimmons Foto

„I'm a slave to my indifference.“

—  William Fitzsimmons American musician 1978

Until When We Are Ghosts (2006), Shattered

Elie Wiesel Foto

„The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference.“

—  Elie Wiesel writer, professor, political activist, Nobel Laureate, and Holocaust survivor 1928 - 2016

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„If moderation is a fault, then indifference is a crime.“

—  Jack Kerouac American writer 1922 - 1969

Not a Kerouac quote, but by Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (1742-1799), the German scientist, satirist, and Anglophile: http://www.quotes.net/quote/58450
Misattributed

Peter Kropotkin Foto

„Indifference from this point on is impossible.“

—  Peter Kropotkin Russian zoologist, evolutionary theorist, philosopher, scientist, revolutionary, economist, activist, geographer, writer 1842 - 1921

The Spirit of Revolt (1880)
Kontext: Whoever has a slight knowledge of history and a fairly clear head knows perfectly well from the beginning that theoretical propaganda for revolution will necessarily express itself in action long before the theoreticians have decided that the moment to act has come. Nevertheless, the cautious theoreticians are angry at these madmen, they excommunicate them, they anathematize them. But the madmen win sympathy, the mass of the people secretly applaud their courage, and they find imitators. In proportion as the pioneers go to fill the jails and the penal colonies, others continue their work; acts of illegal protest, of revolt, of vengeance, multiply.
Indifference from this point on is impossible. Those who at the beginning never so much as asked what the "madmen" wanted, are compelled to think about them, to discuss their ideas, to take sides for or against. By actions which compel general attention, the new idea seeps into people's minds and wins converts. One such act may, in a few days, make more propaganda than thousands of pamphlets.
Above all, it awakens the spirit of revolt: it breeds daring. The old order, supported by the police, the magistrates, the gendarmes and the soldiers, appeared unshakable, like the old fortress of the Bastille, which also appeared impregnable to the eyes of the unarmed people gathered beneath its high walls equipped with loaded cannon. But soon it became apparent that the established order has not the force one had supposed.

Karel Čapek Foto

„Relativism is not indifference; on the contrary, passionate indifference is necessary in order for you not to hear the voices that oppose your absolute decrees“

—  Karel Čapek Czech writer 1890 - 1938

"On Relativism" (1925)
Kontext: Socialism is good when it comes to wages, but it tells me nothing when it comes to other questions in life that are more private and painful, for which I must seek answers elsewhere. Relativism is not indifference; on the contrary, passionate indifference is necessary in order for you not to hear the voices that oppose your absolute decrees … Relativism is neither a method of fighting, nor a method of creating, for both of these are uncompromising and at times even ruthless; rather, it is a method of cognition. If one must fight or create, it is necessary that this be preceded by the broadest possible knowledge... One of the worst muddles of this age is its confusing of the ideas behind combative and cognitive activity. Cognition is not fighting, but once someone knows a lot, he will have much to fight for, so much that he will be called a relativist because of it.

John C. Wright Foto

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