„Do not try to make the Bible relevant. Its relevance is axiomatic. Do not defend God's word, but testify to it. Trust to the Word. It is a ship loaded to the very limits of its capacity. -Dietrich Bonhoeffer“

Quelle: Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte

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„To acclaim that the Bible contains the Word of God is not to say that all its words are the words of God.“

—  Leslie Weatherhead English theologian 1893 - 1976

Quelle: The Christian Agnostic (1965), p.96 (Unnamed * “scholarly writer”: London Times. December 4, 1954)

Hermann von Keyserling Foto

„Hinduism at its best has spoken the only relevant truth about the way to self-realization in the full sense of the word.“

—  Hermann von Keyserling German philosopher 1880 - 1946

Count Hermann Keyserling, The Huston Smith Reader, p. 122

Charles Hodge Foto

„The best evidence of the Bible's being the word of God is to be found between its covers. It proves itself.“

—  Charles Hodge American Presbyterian theologian 1797 - 1878

Quelle: Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), P. 35.

Ken Ham Foto

„The Bible teaches clearly that compromise destroys! We need to return to the authority of God's Word and its answers.“

—  Ken Ham Australian young Earth creationist 1951

Did Eve really have an Extra Rib?: And other tough questions about the Bible (2002)

Aldous Huxley Foto

„The old idea that words possess magical powers is false; but its falsity is the distortion of a very important truth. Words do have a magical effect — but not in the way that magicians supposed, and not on the objects they were trying to influence. Words are magical in the way they affect the minds of those who use them.“

—  Aldous Huxley English writer 1894 - 1963

Quoted as the opening passage of "BOOK ONE: The Functions of Language" in Language in Thought and Action (1949) by S. I. Hayakawa, p. 3
Words and Their Meanings (1940)
Kontext: A great deal of attention has been paid … to the technical languages in which men of science do their specialized thinking … But the colloquial usages of everyday speech, the literary and philosophical dialects in which men do their thinking about the problems of morals, politics, religion and psychology — these have been strangely neglected. We talk about "mere matters of words" in a tone which implies that we regard words as things beneath the notice of a serious-minded person.
This is a most unfortunate attitude. For the fact is that words play an enormous part in our lives and are therefore deserving of the closest study. The old idea that words possess magical powers is false; but its falsity is the distortion of a very important truth. Words do have a magical effect — but not in the way that magicians supposed, and not on the objects they were trying to influence. Words are magical in the way they affect the minds of those who use them. "A mere matter of words," we say contemptuously, forgetting that words have power to mould men's thinking, to canalize their feeling, to direct their willing and acting. Conduct and character are largely determined by the nature of the words we currently use to discuss ourselves and the world around us.

Martin Luther Foto

„The soul can do without everything except the word of God, without which none at all of its wants are provided for.“

—  Martin Luther seminal figure in Protestant Reformation 1483 - 1546

Quelle: On Christian Liberty

Victor Hugo Foto
Dave Barry Foto

„In the words of a very famous dead person, 'A nation that does not know its history is doomed to do poorly on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.“

—  Dave Barry American writer 1947

Quelle: Dave Barry Slept Here: A Sort of History of the United States

Kent Hovind Foto
Gabriel Marcel Foto
Pearl S.  Buck Foto
Nayef Al-Rodhan Foto
Max Horkheimer Foto
Ken Ham Foto
Rachel Cohn Foto
Helen Keller Foto
Robert G. Ingersoll Foto

„Each thing that exists testifies of its perfection. The earth, with its heart of fire and crowns of snow; with its forests and plains, its rocks and seas; with its every wave and cloud; with its every leaf and bud and flower, confirms its every word, and the solemn stars, shining in the infinite abysses, are the eternal witnesses of its truth.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

Heretics and Heresies (1874)
Kontext: By this time the whole world should know that the real Bible has not yet been written, but is being written, and that it will never be finished until the race begins its downward march, or ceases to exist.
The real Bible is not the work of inspired men, nor prophets, nor apostles, nor evangelists, nor of Christs. Every man who finds a fact, adds, as it were, a word to this great book. It is not attested by prophecy, by miracles or signs. It makes no appeal to faith, to ignorance, to credulity or fear. It has no punishment for unbelief, and no reward for hypocrisy. It appeals to man in the name of demonstration. It has nothing to conceal. It has no fear of being read, of being contradicted, of being investigated and understood. It does not pretend to be holy, or sacred; it simply claims to be true. It challenges the scrutiny of all, and implores every reader to verify every line for himself. It is incapable of being blasphemed. This book appeals to all the surroundings of man. Each thing that exists testifies of its perfection. The earth, with its heart of fire and crowns of snow; with its forests and plains, its rocks and seas; with its every wave and cloud; with its every leaf and bud and flower, confirms its every word, and the solemn stars, shining in the infinite abysses, are the eternal witnesses of its truth.

Theodor W. Adorno Foto

„What is or is not the jargon is determined by whether the word is written in an intonation which places it transcendently in opposition to its own meaning; by whether the individual words are loaded at the expense of the sentence, its propositional force, and the thought content. In that sense the character of the jargon would be quite formal: it sees to it that what it wants is on the whole felt and accepted through its mere delivery, without regard to the content of the words used.“

—  Theodor W. Adorno German sociologist, philosopher and musicologist known for his critical theory of society 1903 - 1969

Was Jargon sei und was nicht, darüber entscheidet, ob das Wort in dem Tonfall geschrieben ist, in dem es sich als transzendent gegenüber der eigenen Bedeutung setzt; ob die einzelnen Worte aufgeladen werden auf Kosten von Satz, Urteil, Gedachtem. Demnach wäre der Charakter des Jargons überaus formal: er sorgt dafür, daß, was er möchte, in weitem Maß ohne Rücksicht auf den Inhalt der Worte gespürt und akzeptiert wird durch ihren Vortrag.
Quelle: Jargon der Eigentlichkeit [Jargon of Authenticity] (1964), p. 8

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