„That man is best who sees the truth himself. Good too is he who listens to wise counsel. But who is neither wise himself nor willing to ponder wisdom is not worth a straw.“

—  Hesiod

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Hesiod Foto
Hesiod14
griechischer Dichter

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George William Russell Foto

„It was the wise all-seeing soul
Who counselled neither war nor peace:
'Only be thou thyself that goal
In which the wars of time shall cease.“

—  George William Russell Irish writer, editor, critic, poet, and artistic painter 1867 - 1935

The Nuts of Knowledge (1903)

Niccolo Machiavelli Foto

„A prince who is not wise himself will never take good advice.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli, buch Der Fürst

Variante: Variant translation: A prince who is not wise himself cannot be wisely counseled.
Quelle: The Prince (1513), Ch. 23; translated by W. K. Marriot

http://www.friesian.com/econ.htm

Hesiod Foto

„But he who neither thinks for himself nor learns from others, is a failure as a man.“

—  Hesiod Greek poet

Quelle: Works and Days and Theogony

Julien Offray de La Mettrie Foto
Dogen Foto

„A fool sees himself as another, but a wise man sees others as himself.“

—  Dogen Japanese Zen buddhist teacher 1200 - 1253

Quelle: How to Cook Your Life: From the Zen Kitchen to Enlightenment

Anatole France Foto

„The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.“

—  Anatole France French writer 1844 - 1924

Touchstone, Act V, scene i
Misattributed

William Shakespeare Foto

„The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.“

—  William Shakespeare, As You Like It

Touchstone, Act V, scene i
Quelle: As You Like It (1599–1600)

Hesiod Foto

„This man, I say, is most perfect who shall have understood everything for himself, after having devised what may be best afterward and unto the end: and good again is he likewise who shall have complied with one advising him well: but whoso neither himself hath understanding, nor when he hears another, lays it to heart, he on the other hand is a worthless man.“

—  Hesiod, buch Werke und Tage

Original: (el) Οὗτος μὲν πανάριστος, ὃς αὐτὸς πάντα νοήσει,
φρασσάμενος, τά κ᾽ ἔπειτα καὶ ἐς τέλος ᾖσιν ἀμείνω·
ἐσθλὸς δ᾽ αὖ καὶ κεῖνος, ὃς εὖ εἰπόντι πίθηται·
ὃς δέ κε μήτ᾽ αὐτὸς νοέῃ μήτ᾽ ἄλλου ἀκούων
ἐν θυμῷ βάλληται, ὁ δ᾽ αὖτ᾽ ἀχρῄος ἀνήρ.
Quelle: Works and Days (c. 700 BC), line 293.

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Stefan Zweig Foto

„Youth is always right. Those who follow the counsels of youth are wise.“

—  Stefan Zweig Austrian writer 1881 - 1942

Confusion of Feelings or Confusion: The Private Papers of Privy Councillor R. Von D (1927)

Alfred, Lord Tennyson Foto

„Nor is he the wisest man who never proved himself a fool.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson British poet laureate 1809 - 1892

Stanza 124
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After (1886)

Michel De Montaigne Foto

„A wise man never loses anything, if he has himself.“

—  Michel De Montaigne, buch Essays

Book I, Ch. 38. Of Solitude
Essais (1595), Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Karl Jaspers Foto

„The Greek word for philosopher (philosophos) connotes a distinction from sophos. It signifies the lover of wisdom (knowledge) as distinguished from him who considers himself wise in the possession of knowledge. This meaning of the word still endures: the essence of philosophy is not the possession of the truth but the search for truth.“

—  Karl Jaspers German psychiatrist and philosopher 1883 - 1969

Way to Wisdom: An Introduction to Philosophy (1951) as translated by Ralph Mannheim, Ch. 1, What is Philosophy?, p. 12
Variant translation: It is the search for the truth, not possession of the truth which is the way of philosophy. Its questions are more relevant than its answers, and every answer becomes a new question.
Kontext: The Greek word for philosopher (philosophos) connotes a distinction from sophos. It signifies the lover of wisdom (knowledge) as distinguished from him who considers himself wise in the possession of knowledge. This meaning of the word still endures: the essence of philosophy is not the possession of the truth but the search for truth. … Philosophy means to be on the way. Its questions are more essential than its answers, and every answer becomes a new question.

Friedrich Nietzsche Foto

„He who obeys, does not listen to himself!“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, buch Also sprach Zarathustra

Quelle: Thus Spoke Zarathustra

E. W. Howe Foto

„The man who can keep a secret may be wise, but he is not half as wise as the man with no secrets to keep.“

—  E. W. Howe Novelist, magazine and newspaper editor 1853 - 1937

Country Town Sayings (1911), p9.

Marguerite de Navarre Foto

„Man is wise … when he recognises no greater enemy than himself.“

—  Marguerite de Navarre, buch Heptaméron

Third Day, Novel XXX
L'Heptaméron (1558)

James Russell Lowell Foto

„A wise man travels to discover himself.“

—  James Russell Lowell American poet, critic, editor, and diplomat 1819 - 1891

Leonardo Da Vinci Foto

„Ask counsel of him who rules himself well.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519

The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci (1883), XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations.

Euripidés Foto

„Events will take their course, it is no good of being angry at them; he is happiest who wisely turns them to the best account.“

—  Euripidés, Bellerophon

Bellerophon, Fragment 298; quoted in Plutarch's Morals : Ethical Essays (1888) edited and translated by Arthur Richard Shilleto, p. 293

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