„The truth is, if we become comfortable with who we are rather than who we think we should be, then we will be less insecure.“

Quelle: Learning from the Heart: Lessons on Living, Loving, and Listening

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Daniel Gottlieb Foto
Daniel Gottlieb1
French rabbi 1939 - 2010

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Edmund Burke Foto

„But if we think this necessity rather imaginary than real, we should renounce their dreams of society, together with their visions of religion, and vindicate ourselves into perfect liberty.“

—  Edmund Burke, buch A Vindication of Natural Society

A Vindication of Natural Society (1756)
Kontext: We are indebted for all our miseries to our distrust of that guide, which Providence thought sufficient for our condition, our own natural reason, which rejecting both in human and Divine things, we have given our necks to the yoke of political and theological slavery. We have renounced the prerogative of man, and it is no wonder that we should be treated like beasts. But our misery is much greater than theirs, as the crime we commit in rejecting the lawful dominion of our reason is greater than any which they can commit. If, after all, you should confess all these things, yet plead the necessity of political institutions, weak and wicked as they are, I can argue with equal, perhaps superior, force, concerning the necessity of artificial religion; and every step you advance in your argument, you add a strength to mine. So that if we are resolved to submit our reason and our liberty to civil usurpation, we have nothing to do but to conform as quietly as we can to the vulgar notions which are connected with this, and take up the theology of the vulgar as well as their politics. But if we think this necessity rather imaginary than real, we should renounce their dreams of society, together with their visions of religion, and vindicate ourselves into perfect liberty.

Percy Bysshe Shelley Foto
Alan Moore Foto

„I think these will both still be with us, but fascism becomes less and less possible. We have to accept that we are moving towards some sort of anarchy.“

—  Alan Moore English writer primarily known for his work in comic books 1953

De Abaitua interview (1998)
Kontext: We only know the world as we have lived in it. A lot of things we thought were givens have turned out to be local and temporary phenomena. Capitalism and communism felt like they were always going to be around, but it turns out they were just two ways of ordering an industrial society. If you were looking for more fundamental human political poles, you’d take anarchy and fascism, for my money. Which are not dependent upon economic trends because they are both a bit mad. One of them is complete abdication of individual responsibility into the collective, and one of them absolute responsibility for the individual. I think these will both still be with us, but fascism becomes less and less possible. We have to accept that we are moving towards some sort of anarchy.

John Banville Foto
Carlos Ruiz Zafón Foto

„We humans are willing to believe anything rather than the truth.“

—  Carlos Ruiz Zafón, buch Der Schatten des Windes

Variante: We are willing to believe anything other than the truth.
Quelle: The Shadow of the Wind

Fernando Pessoa Foto
Gautama Buddha Foto

„What we think, we become.“

—  Gautama Buddha philosopher, reformer and the founder of Buddhism -563 - -483 v.Chr

Jodi Picoult Foto
Frans de Waal Foto

„We do not always act the way economists think we should, mainly because we're both less selfish and less rational than economists think we are. Economists are being indoctrinated into a cardboard version of human nature, which they hold true to such a degree that their own behavior has begun to resemble it.“

—  Frans de Waal Dutch primatologist and ethologist 1948

"Our Inner Ape: A Leading Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Are" (2005), p. 243
Kontext: In 1879, American economist Francis Walker tried to explain why members of his profession were in such "bad odor amongst real people". He blamed it on their inability to understand why human behavior fails to comply with economic theory. We do not always act the way economists think we should, mainly because we're both less selfish and less rational than economists think we are. Economists are being indoctrinated into a cardboard version of human nature, which they hold true to such a degree that their own behavior has begun to resemble it. Psychological tests have shown that economics majors are more egoistic than the average college student. Exposure in class after class to the capitalist self-interest model apparently kills off whatever prosocial tendencies these students have to begin with. They give up trusting others, and conversely others give up trusting them. Hence the bad odor.

Terry Pratchett Foto
Eleanor Roosevelt Foto

„I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then live with that decision.“

—  Eleanor Roosevelt American politician, diplomat, and activist, and First Lady of the United States 1884 - 1962

As quoted in Peter's Quotations : Ideas for Our Time (1972) by Laurence J. Peter, p. 5

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