„The principal mark of genius is not perfection but originality, the opening of new frontiers.“

Letzte Aktualisierung 3. Juni 2021. Geschichte
Arthur Koestler Foto
Arthur Koestler2
britischer Schriftsteller 1905 - 1983

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Henry Kirke White Foto

„New plains frontier was politically organized and opened and settled with little, if any, heed to its natural features of climate and land cover.“

—  John M. Gaus American political scientist 1894 - 1969

John Merriman Gaus, cited in: Renée Beville Flower, ‎Brent M. Haddad (2014), Reawakening the Public Research University. p. 197

Voltaire Foto

„It is the privilege of true genius, and certainly of the genius that opens a new road, to make without punishment great mistakes.“

—  Voltaire, Le Siècle de Louis XIV

"Siècle de Louis XIV," ch. 32 (1751), qtd. in Arthur Schopenhauer, "The World as Will and Representation," Criticism of the Kantian philosophy (1818)
Citas
Original: (fr) C'est le privilège du vrai génie, et surtout du génie qui ouvre une carrière, de faire impunément de grandes fautes.

Albert Einstein Foto

„The mind that opens to a new idea, Never comes back to its original size.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Actually said by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. in his book The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table: "Every now and then a man's mind is stretched by a new idea or sensation, and never shrinks back to its former dimensions."
Misattributed

Ernest Flagg Foto

„Simplicity is the mark of genius.“

—  Ernest Flagg American architect 1857 - 1947

Small Houses: Their Economic Design and Construction (1922)
Kontext: Simplicity and Dignity are so nearly related that they may be considered together.... A quiet air of reserved power is characteristic of dignity, and that is best obtained by simple means and the absence of apparent effort. Simplicity is the mark of genius. The giant in art does his work easily, without straining and without affectation; his ways are direct and to the point.

John F. Kennedy Foto

„I have spoken about the New Frontier.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

1963
Kontext: For more than 3 years I have spoken about the New Frontier. This is not a partisan term, and it is not the exclusive property of Republicans or Democrats. It refers, instead, to this Nation's place in history, to the fact that we do stand on the edge of a great new era, filled with both crisis and opportunity, an era to be characterized by achievement and by challenge. It is an era which calls for action and for the best efforts of all those who would test the unknown and the uncertain in every phase of human endeavor. It is a time for pathfinders and pioneers.

Matthew Arnold Foto
Lucy Stone Foto

„The opening of Oberlin to women marked an epoch.“

—  Lucy Stone American abolitionist and suffragist 1818 - 1893

The Progress of Fifty Years (1893)
Kontext: In 1833, Oberlin College, in Ohio, was founded. Its charter declared its grand object, - "To give the most useful education at the least expense of health, time, and money, and to extend the benefits of such education to both sexes and to all classes; and the elevation of the female character by bringing within the reach of the misjudged and neglected sex all the instructive privileges which have hitherto unreasonably distinguished the leading sex from theirs." These were the words of Father Shippen, which, if not heard in form, were heard in fact as widely as the world. The opening of Oberlin to women marked an epoch.

„As Voltaire once remarked, "It is the privilege of the real genius, especially one who opens up a new path, to make great mistakes with impunity."“

—  Bryan Magee British politician 1930 - 2019

Quelle: Confessions of a Philosopher (1997), p. 157
Kontext: As Voltaire once remarked, "It is the privilege of the real genius, especially one who opens up a new path, to make great mistakes with impunity." The Copernican revolution brought about by Kant was, I think, the most important single turning point in the history of philosophy. For that reason there has been, ever since, a watershed in understanding between those who have taken his work on board and those who have not. For a good many of the problems he uncovered, the solutions he put forward have not stood the test of time, but his uncovering of the problems remains the most illuminating thing a philosopher has ever done. Because of the fundamental character of these problems, and because Kant did not solve them, confronting them has been the most important challenge to philosophy ever since.

Alexander von Humboldt Foto

„A physical delineation of nature terminates at the point where the sphere of intellect begins, and a new world of mind is opened to our view. It marks the limit, but does not pass it.“

—  Alexander von Humboldt, buch Kosmos

Kosmos (1845 - 1847)
Kontext: From the remotest nebulæ and from the revolving double stars, we have descended to the minutest organisms of animal creation, whether manifested in the depths of ocean or on the surface of our globe, and to the delicate vegetable germs which clothe the naked declivity of the ice-crowned mountain summit; and here we have been able to arrange these phenomena according to partially known laws; but other laws of a more mysterious nature rule the higher spheres of the organic world, in which is comprised the human species in all its varied conformation, its creative intellectual power, and the languages to which it has given existence. A physical delineation of nature terminates at the point where the sphere of intellect begins, and a new world of mind is opened to our view. It marks the limit, but does not pass it.

Jean-Étienne Montucla Foto

„No one ever squared the circle with so much genius, or, excepting his principal object, with so much success.“

—  Jean-Étienne Montucla French mathematician 1725 - 1799

Attributed to Montucla in Augustus De Morgan, A Budget of Paradoxes, (London, 1872), p. 96; Cited in: Robert Edouard Moritz. Memorabilia mathematica; or, The philomath's quotation-book, (1914) p. 366
About Gregory St. Vincent, described by De Morgan as "the greatest of circle-squarers, and his investigations led him into many truths: he found the property of the arc of the hyperbola which led to Napier's logarithms being called hyperbolic."

John Locke Foto

„To love truth for truth's sake is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and the seed-plot of all other virtues.“

—  John Locke English philosopher and physician 1632 - 1704

Letter to Anthony Collins (29 October 1703) http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1726#lf0128-09_head_098

Ayn Rand Foto

„A genius is a genius, regardless of the number of morons who belong to the same race—and a moron is a moron, regardless of the number of geniuses who share his racial origin.“

—  Ayn Rand Russian-American novelist and philosopher 1905 - 1982

http://alexpeak.com/twr/racism/
The Virtue of Selfishness (1964)
Quelle: The Virtue of Selfishness: A New Concept of Egoism

Thomas Carlyle Foto

„The man of Humor sees common life, even mean life, under the new light of sportfulness and love ; whatever has existence has a charm for him. Humor has justly been regarded as the finest perfection of poetic genius.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

1820s, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays (1827–1855)
Kontext: Humor is properly the exponent of low things; that which first renders them poetical to the mind. The man of Humor sees common life, even mean life, under the new light of sportfulness and love; whatever has existence has a charm for him. Humor has justly been regarded as the finest perfection of poetic genius. He who wants it, be his other gifts what they may, has only half a mind; an eye for what is above him, not for what is about him or below him. Now, among all writers of any real poetic genius, we cannot recollect one who, in this respect, exhibits such total deficiency as Schiller. In his whole writings there is scarcely any vestige of it, scarcely any attempt that way. His nature was without Humor; and he had too true a feeling to adopt any counterfeit in its stead. Thus no drollery or caricature, still less any barren mockery, which, in the hundred cases are all that we find passing current as Humor, discover themselves in Schiller. His works are full of labored earnestness; he is the gravest of all writers.

Edith Wharton Foto

„True originality consists not in a new manner but in a new vision.“

—  Edith Wharton American novelist, short story writer, designer 1862 - 1937

The Writing of Fiction (1925), ch. I

G. K. Chesterton Foto

„An open mind is really a mark of foolishness, like an open mouth. Mouths and minds were made to shut; they were made to open only in order to shut.“

—  G. K. Chesterton English mystery novelist and Christian apologist 1874 - 1936

Original quote:
For my friend said that he opened his intellect as the sun opens the fans of a palm tree, opening for opening's sake, opening infinitely for ever. But I said that I opened my intellect as I opened my mouth, in order to shut it again on something solid. I was doing it at the moment. And as I truly pointed out, it would look uncommonly silly if I went on opening my mouth infinitely, for ever and ever.
The Extraordinary Cabman, one of many essays collected in Tremendous Trifles (1909)
Misattributed

Anatole France Foto

„Beyond that, it was impossible to obtain a word from the valiant chief, and this silence seemed the mark of a genius sure of himself.“

—  Anatole France, buch The Revolt of the Angels

Quelle: The Revolt of the Angels (1914), Ch. XXXV
Kontext: The archangel Michael took supreme command. He reassured their minds by his serenity. His countenance, wherein his soul was visible, expressed contempt for danger. By his orders, the chiefs of the thunderbolts, the Kerûbs, grown dull with the long interval of peace, paced with heavy steps the ramparts of the Holy Mountain, and, letting the gaze of their bovine eyes wander over the glittering clouds of their Lord, strove to place the divine batteries in position. After inspecting the defences, they swore to the Most High that all was in readiness. They took counsel together as to the plan they should follow. Michael was for the offensive. He, as a consummate soldier, said it was the supreme law. Attack, or be attacked, — there was no middle course.
"Moreover," he added, "the offensive attitude is particularly suitable to the ardour of the Thrones and Dominations."
Beyond that, it was impossible to obtain a word from the valiant chief, and this silence seemed the mark of a genius sure of himself.

Moshe Dayan Foto

„A new State of Israel with broad frontiers, strong and solid, with the authority of the Israel Government extending from the Jordan to the Suez Canal.“

—  Moshe Dayan Israeli military leader and politician 1915 - 1981

Statement made in April 1973 from the peaks of Massada.
The Iron Wall (1999)

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Foto

„It is a matter of perfect indifference where a thing originated; the only question is: "Is it true in and for itself?"“

—  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, buch Lectures on the Philosophy of History

Pt. III, sec. 3, ch. 2 Lectures on the History of History Vol 1 p. 344 John Sibree translation (1857), 1914
Lectures on the Philosophy of History (1832), Volume 1
Kontext: It is a matter of perfect indifference where a thing originated; the only question is: "Is it true in and for itself?" Many think that by pronouncing a doctrine to be Neo-Platonic, they have ipso facto banished it from Christianity. Whether a Christian doctrine stands exactly thus or thus in the Bible, the point to which the exegetical scholars of modern times devote all their attention is not the only question. The Letter kills, the Spirit makes alive: this they say themselves, yet pervert the sentiment by taking the Understanding for the Spirit.

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