„Each of us must turn inward and destroy in himself all that he thinks he ought to destroy in others.“

— Etty Hillesum

Etty Hillesum Foto
Etty Hillesum2
niederländisch-jüdische Lehrerin 1914 - 1943
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Pablo Neruda Foto

„He who does not travel, who does not read,
who does not listen to music,
who does not find grace in himself,
she who does not find grace in herself,
dies slowly.
He who slowly destroys his own self-esteem,
who does not allow himself to be helped,
[dies slowly... ]“

— Pablo Neruda, Selected Poems
Poem "Muere lentamente" (Dying Slowly), wrongly attributed to Pablo Neruda. See [http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=325275&CategoryId=14094 "Fake Pablo Neruda Poem Spreads on Internet"] by Ana Mendoza, Latin American Herald Tribune (12 January 2009).

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W.E.B. Du Bois Foto

„Either the United States will destroy ignorance or ignorance will destroy the United States.“

— W.E.B. Du Bois American sociologist, historian, activist and writer 1868 - 1963
Context: The school system in the country districts of the South is a disgrace and in few towns and cities are Negro schools what they ought to be. We want the national government to step in and wipe out illiteracy in the South. Either the United States will destroy ignorance or ignorance will destroy the United States. And when we call for education we mean real education. We believe in work. We ourselves are workers, but work is not necessarily education. Education is the development of power and ideal. We want our children trained as intelligent human beings should be, and we will fight for all time against any proposal to educate black boys and girls simply as servants and underlings, or simply for the use of other people. They have a right to know, to think, to aspire. These are some of the chief things which we want. How shall we get them? By voting where we may vote, by persistent, unceasing agitation; by hammering at the truth, by sacrifice and work. We do not believe in violence, neither in the despised violence of the raid nor the lauded violence of the soldier, nor the barbarous violence of the mob, but we do believe in John Brown, in that incarnate spirit of justice, that hatred of a lie, that willingness to sacrifice money, reputation, and life itself on the altar of right. And here on the scene of John Brown’s martyrdom we reconsecrate ourselves, our honor, our property to the final emancipation of the race which John Brown died to make free. Our enemies, triumphant for the present, are fighting the stars in their courses. Justice and humanity must prevail. [http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/niagara-movement-speech/ "Niagara Movement Speech" (1905)] <!--originally a portion of this was cited here to an Address to the Nation speech at Harpers Ferry, Virginia (16 August 1906); published in the New York Times on (20 August 1906) — but that does not correspond with the info at the link. -->

Karl Popper Foto

„By reluctance to criticize some of it, we may help to destroy it all.“

— Karl Popper Austrian-British philosopher of science 1902 - 1994
Context: If in this book harsh words are spoken about some of the greatest among the intellectual leaders of mankind, my motive is not, I hope, the wish to belittle them. It springs rather from my conviction that, if our civilization is to survive, we must break with the habit of deference to great men. Great men may make great mistakes; and as the book tries to show, some of the greatest leaders of the past supported the perennial attack on freedom and reason. Their influence, too rarely challenged, continues to mislead those on whose defence civilization depends, and to divide them. The responsibility of this tragic and possibly fatal division becomes ours if we hesitate to be outspoken in our criticism of what admittedly is a part of our intellectual heritage. By reluctance to criticize some of it, we may help to destroy it all. Preface to the First Edition

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Pablo Picasso Foto

„I begin with an idea and then it becomes something else. After all, what is a painter? He is a collector who gets what he likes in others by painting them himself. This is how I begin and then it becomes something else.“

— Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973
Quoted in: Ann Livermore (1988), Artists and Aesthetics in Spain. p. 154

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Robert E. Lee Foto

„A true man of honor feels humbled himself when he cannot help humbling others.“

— Robert E. Lee Confederate general in the Civil War 1807 - 1870
Context: The forbearing use of power does not only form a touchstone, but the manner in which an individual enjoys certain advantages over others is a test of a true gentleman. The power which the strong have over the weak, the employer over the employed, the educated over the unlettered, the experienced over the confiding, even the clever over the silly — the forbearing or inoffensive use of all this power or authority, or a total abstinence from it when the case admits it, will show the gentleman in a plain light. The gentleman does not needlessly and unnecessarily remind an offender of a wrong he may have committed against him. He cannot only forgive, he can forget; and he strives for that nobleness of self and mildness of character which imparts sufficient strength to let the past be but the past. A true man of honor feels humbled himself when he cannot help humbling others. [http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CAP/LEE/gentdef.html "Definition of a Gentleman"], a memorandum found in his papers after his death, as quoted in Lee the American (1912) by Gamaliel Bradford, p. 233

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Pablo Picasso Foto

„He can who thinks he can, and he can't who thinks he can't. This is an inexorable, indisputable law.“

— Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973

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