„I passionately hate the idea of being with it, I think an artist has always to be out of step with his time.“

Orson Welles Foto
Orson Welles3
US-amerikanischer Filmregisseur, Schauspieler und Autor 1915 - 1985
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Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. Foto
Larry Ellison Foto

„I hate the PC, with a passion.“

—  Larry Ellison American internet entrepreneur, businessman and philanthropist 1944
Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires (1996), 47"00.

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George Moore (novelist) Foto

„A great artist is always before his time or behind it.“

—  George Moore (novelist) Irish novelist, short-story writer, poet, art critic, memoirist and dramatist 1852 - 1933
As quoted in Conversations with George Moore (1929) by Geraint Goodwin, p. 123

Abraham Lincoln Foto

„I have always hated slavery, I think as much as any Abolitionist.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865
1850s, Speech https://cwcrossroads.wordpress.com/2011/01/18/race-and-slavery-north-and-south-some-logical-fallacies/#comment-47560 (10 July 1858)

Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette Foto

„An irresistible passion that would induce me to believe in innate ideas, and the truth of prophecy, has decided my career. I have always loved liberty with the enthusiasm which actuates the religious man with the passion of a lover, and with the conviction of a geometrician.“

—  Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette French general and politician 1757 - 1834
Context: An irresistible passion that would induce me to believe in innate ideas, and the truth of prophecy, has decided my career. I have always loved liberty with the enthusiasm which actuates the religious man with the passion of a lover, and with the conviction of a geometrician. On leaving college, where nothing had displeased me more than a state of dependance, I viewed the greatness and the littleness of the court with contempt, the frivolities of society with pity, the minute pedantry of the army with disgust, and oppression of every sort with indignation. The attraction of the American revolution transported me suddenly to my place. I felt myself tranquil only when sailing between the continent whose powers I had braved, and that where, although our arrival and our ultimate success were problematical, I could, at the age of nineteen, take refuge in the alternative of conquering or perishing in the cause to which I had devoted myself. Letter to the Bailli de Ploën, as quoted in Recollections of the Private Life of General Lafayette (1835) by Jules Germain Cloquet, Vol. I, p. 24

Albert Jay Nock Foto

„This idea was vague at the moment, as I say, and I did not work it out for some years, but I think I never quite lost track of it from that time.“

—  Albert Jay Nock American journalist 1870 - 1945
Context: Once, I remember, I ran across the case of a boy who had been sentenced to prison, a poor, scared little brat, who had intended something no worse than mischief, and it turned out to be a crime. The judge said he disliked to sentence the lad; it seemed the wrong thing to do; but the law left him no option. I was struck by this. The judge, then, was doing something as an official that he would not dream of doing as a man; and he could do it without any sense of responsibility, or discomfort, simply because he was acting as an official and not as a man. On this principle of action, it seemed to me that one could commit almost any kind of crime without getting into trouble with one's conscience. Clearly, a great crime had been committed against this boy; yet nobody who had had a hand in it — the judge, the jury, the prosecutor, the complaining witness, the policemen and jailers — felt any responsibility about it, because they were not acting as men, but as officials. Clearly, too, the public did not regard them as criminals, but rather as upright and conscientious men. The idea came to me then, vaguely but unmistakably, that if the primary intention of government was not to abolish crime but merely to monopolize crime, no better device could be found for doing it than the inculcation of precisely this frame of mind in the officials and in the public; for the effect of this was to exempt both from any allegiance to those sanctions of humanity or decency which anyone of either class, acting as an individual, would have felt himself bound to respect — nay, would have wished to respect. This idea was vague at the moment, as I say, and I did not work it out for some years, but I think I never quite lost track of it from that time. "Anarchist's Progress" in The American Mercury (1927); § III : To Abolish Crime or to Monopolize It? http://www.mises.org/daily/2714

Stephenie Meyer Foto
Francis Bacon (artist) Foto

„I feel ever so strongly that an artist must be nourished by his passions and his despairs. These things alter an artist whether for the good or the better or the worse. It must alter him.“

—  Francis Bacon (artist) Irish-born British painter 1909 - 1992
Context: I feel ever so strongly that an artist must be nourished by his passions and his despairs. These things alter an artist whether for the good or the better or the worse. It must alter him. The feelings of desperation and unhappiness are more useful to an artist than the feeling of contentment, because desperation and unhappiness stretch your whole sensibility. As quoted in The Artist Observed: 28 interviews with contemporary artists (1991) by John Gruen, p. 3

Georg Solti Foto
Bernard Cornwell Foto
Marcel Duchamp Foto

„To all appearances, the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.“

—  Marcel Duchamp French painter and sculptor 1887 - 1968
1951 - 1968, The Creative Act', 1957, Context: Let us consider two important factors, the two poles of the creation of art: the artist on one hand, and on the other the spectator who later becomes the posterity; to all appearances the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.

Salma Hayek Foto

„I'm going to tell you something: There's an element to that passion that I always leave out and that I have recently learned to understand, and it has helped me a lot. … I was okay if it didn't happen.“

—  Salma Hayek Mexican-American actress and producer 1966
O interview (2003), Context: I'm going to tell you something: There's an element to that passion that I always leave out and that I have recently learned to understand, and it has helped me a lot. … I was okay if it didn't happen. … I didn't realize this before. As long as I knew I did my very, very best, I was okay. I was so okay that when I made the transition from Mexico to Los Angeles, I said to myself I have something now. Is it what I want? No. I was making money, I was an actress, and I was famous. It looked like it's what I wanted, but it was not. And I was wise enough to recognize it. It's what others would think that I'd want, and sometimes that makes you feel it's good enough... To be able to brag a lot on life — that's everybody's dream... But is it your dream? And it wasn't my dream. And so I said that I'm going to leave it. This means I go there, and maybe it doesn't happen. And I am trading this, which looks like it's great, for this nothing that could be anything. … And then I was excited about being brave about it and saying, "What I left didn't grab me by the balls."

Cassandra Clare Foto
George Boole Foto
David Mitchell Foto

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“