„It is the nature of man to rise to greatness if greatness is expected of him.“

John Steinbeck Foto
John Steinbeck8
US-amerikanischer Autor 1902 - 1968
Werbung

Ähnliche Zitate

Thomas Carlyle Foto

„The Great Man here too, as always, is a Force of Nature. Whatsoever is truly great in him springs up from the inarticulate deeps.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

Henry David Thoreau Foto

„If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him … he will be surrounded by grandeur.“

—  Henry David Thoreau 1817-1862 American poet, essayist, naturalist, and abolitionist 1817 - 1862
Context: Men and boys are learning all kinds of trades but how to make men of themselves. They learn to make houses; but they are not so well housed, they are not so contented in their houses, as the woodchucks in their holes. What is the use of a house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on? — If you cannot tolerate the planet that it is on? Grade the ground first. If a man believes and expects great things of himself, it makes no odds where you put him, or what you show him … he will be surrounded by grandeur. He is in the condition of a healthy and hungry man, who says to himself, — How sweet this crust is! Letter to Harrison Blake (20 May 1860); published in Familiar Letters (1865)

Werbung
Pierre Joseph Proudhon Foto

„The great are only great because we are on our knees. Let us rise“

—  Pierre Joseph Proudhon French politician, mutualist philosopher, economist, and socialist 1809 - 1865

William Carey (missionary) Foto

„Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God.“

—  William Carey (missionary) English Baptist missionary and a Particular Baptist minister 1761 - 1834
As quoted in The Baptist Herald and Friend of Africa (October 1842) and "The Missionary Herald" in The Baptist Magazine Vol. 35 (January 1843), p. 41

Niccolo Machiavelli Foto
Thomas Tredgold Foto

„Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and convenience of man.“

—  Thomas Tredgold engineer 1788 - 1829
Thomas Tredgold (1828), used in the Royal Charter of the (ICE) published in: The Times, London, article CS102127326, 30 June 1828.

James Russell Lowell Foto

„Before Man made us citizens, great Nature made us men.“

—  James Russell Lowell American poet, critic, editor, and diplomat 1819 - 1891

Horace Mann Foto

„If any man seeks for greatness, let him forget greatness and ask for truth, and he will find both.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859
Journal entry (29 October 1838)

Werbung
George Moore (novelist) Foto
John Ogilby Foto

„Great Expectations oft to nothing come.“

—  John Ogilby Scottish academic 1600 - 1676
Fab. VIII: Of the Mountain in Labour

William Cowper Foto
Robert G. Ingersoll Foto

„The barbarian is egotistic enough to suppose that an Infinite Being is constantly doing something, or failing to do something, on his account. But as man rises in the scale of civilization, as he becomes really great, he comes to the conclusion that nothing in Nature happens on his account—that he is hardly great enough to disturb the motions of the planets.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899
Context: As a rule, an individual is egotistic in the proportion that he lacks intelligence. The same is true of nations and races. The barbarian is egotistic enough to suppose that an Infinite Being is constantly doing something, or failing to do something, on his account. But as man rises in the scale of civilization, as he becomes really great, he comes to the conclusion that nothing in Nature happens on his account—that he is hardly great enough to disturb the motions of the planets.

Werbung
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Foto

„Contrary to the vulgar illusion, it is thanks to the metal, and by virtue of it, that the pilot rediscovers nature. As I have already said, the machine does not isolate man from the great problems of nature but plunges him more deeply into them.“

—  Antoine de Saint-Exupéry French writer and aviator 1900 - 1944
Context: !-- There was a time when a flyer sat at the centre of a complicated works. Flight set us factory problems. The indicators that oscillated on the instrument panel warned us of a thousand dangers. But in the machine of today we forget that motors are whirring: the motor, finally, has come to fulfil its function, which is to whirr as a heart beats—and we give no thought to the beating of our heart. Thus, --> Precisely because it is perfect the machine dissembles its own existence instead of forcing itself upon our notice. And thus, also, the realities of nature resume their pride of place. It is not with metal that the pilot is in contact. Contrary to the vulgar illusion, it is thanks to the metal, and by virtue of it, that the pilot rediscovers nature. As I have already said, the machine does not isolate man from the great problems of nature but plunges him more deeply into them. Numerous, nevertheless, are the moralists who have attacked the machine as the source of all the ills we bear, who, creating a fictitious dichotomy, have denounced the mechanical civilization as the enemy of the spiritual civilization. If what they think were really so, then indeed we should have to despair of man, for it would be futile to struggle against this new advancing chaos. The machine is certainly as irresistible in its advance as those virgin forests that encroach upon equatorial domains. Ch III : The Tool

Herman Melville Foto
Abraham Lincoln Foto

„You can tell the greatness of a man by what makes him angry“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Folgend