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William Feather

Geburtstag: 25. August 1889
Todesdatum: 7. Januar 1981

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William A. Feather was an American publisher and author, based in Cleveland, Ohio.

Born in Jamestown, New York, Feather relocated with his family to Cleveland in 1903. After earning a degree from Western Reserve University in 1910, he began working as a reporter for the Cleveland Press. In 1916, he established the William Feather Magazine. In addition to writing for and publishing that magazine, and writing for other magazines as H.L. Mencken's The American Mercury, he ran a successful printing business, and wrote several books.His large printing business, William Feather Printers produced catalogues, magazines, booklets, brochures and corporate annual reports. It moved from Cleveland to Oberlin, Ohio in 1982 after a labor dispute.

Zitate William Feather

„As far as was possible, the subject of this sketch practiced what he preached. Some of his enemies point to this trait as his foremost weakness.“

— William Feather
Context: He was known to some people as a writer. In his writings he espoused thrift, industry, promptness, perseverance, and dependability. … As far as was possible, the subject of this sketch practiced what he preached. Some of his enemies point to this trait as his foremost weakness. Obituary written for himself as one "that would be satisfactory to me in the event of an undesired, but possible, exit" in October 1933, as quoted in [http://blogs.voanews.com/tedlandphairsamerica/2008/10/06/featherisms/ "Featherisms" by Ted Landphair at VOA News (6 October 2008)]

„I like business because it rewards deeds and not words.“

— William Feather
Context: I like business because it is competitive. Business keeps books. The books are the score cards. Profit is the measure of accomplishment, not the ideal measure, but the most practical that can be devised. I like business because it compels earnestness. Amateurs and dilettantes are shoved out. Once in you must fight for survival or be carried to the sidelines. I like business because it requires courage. Cowards do not get to first base. I like business because It demands faith. Faith in human nature, faith in one's self, faith in one's customers, faith in one's employees. I like business because it is the essence of life. Dreams are good, poetical fancies are good, but bread must be baked today, trains must move today, bills must be collected today, payrolls met today. Business feeds, clothes and houses man. I like business because it rewards deeds and not words. I like business because it does not neglect today's task while it is thinking about tomorrow. I like business because it undertakes to please, not to reform. I like business because it is orderly. I like business because it is bold in enterprise. I like business because it is honestly selfish, thereby avoiding the hypocrisy and sentimentality of the unselfish attitude. I like business because it is promptly penalized for its mistakes, shiftlessness and inefficiency. I like business because its philosophy works. I like business because each day is a fresh, adventure. "Why I Like Business" in [http://www.newspapers.com/newspage/8420770/ Manitowoc Herald-Times (21 July 1927), p. 3]

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„I like business because it is competitive.“

— William Feather
Context: I like business because it is competitive. Business keeps books. The books are the score cards. Profit is the measure of accomplishment, not the ideal measure, but the most practical that can be devised. I like business because it compels earnestness. Amateurs and dilettantes are shoved out. Once in you must fight for survival or be carried to the sidelines. I like business because it requires courage. Cowards do not get to first base. I like business because It demands faith. Faith in human nature, faith in one's self, faith in one's customers, faith in one's employees. I like business because it is the essence of life. Dreams are good, poetical fancies are good, but bread must be baked today, trains must move today, bills must be collected today, payrolls met today. Business feeds, clothes and houses man. I like business because it rewards deeds and not words. I like business because it does not neglect today's task while it is thinking about tomorrow. I like business because it undertakes to please, not to reform. I like business because it is orderly. I like business because it is bold in enterprise. I like business because it is honestly selfish, thereby avoiding the hypocrisy and sentimentality of the unselfish attitude. I like business because it is promptly penalized for its mistakes, shiftlessness and inefficiency. I like business because its philosophy works. I like business because each day is a fresh, adventure. "Why I Like Business" in [http://www.newspapers.com/newspage/8420770/ Manitowoc Herald-Times (21 July 1927), p. 3]

„I like business because it is the essence of life. Dreams are good, poetical fancies are good, but bread must be baked today, trains must move today, bills must be collected today, payrolls met today.“

— William Feather
Context: I like business because it is competitive. Business keeps books. The books are the score cards. Profit is the measure of accomplishment, not the ideal measure, but the most practical that can be devised. I like business because it compels earnestness. Amateurs and dilettantes are shoved out. Once in you must fight for survival or be carried to the sidelines. I like business because it requires courage. Cowards do not get to first base. I like business because It demands faith. Faith in human nature, faith in one's self, faith in one's customers, faith in one's employees. I like business because it is the essence of life. Dreams are good, poetical fancies are good, but bread must be baked today, trains must move today, bills must be collected today, payrolls met today. Business feeds, clothes and houses man. I like business because it rewards deeds and not words. I like business because it does not neglect today's task while it is thinking about tomorrow. I like business because it undertakes to please, not to reform. I like business because it is orderly. I like business because it is bold in enterprise. I like business because it is honestly selfish, thereby avoiding the hypocrisy and sentimentality of the unselfish attitude. I like business because it is promptly penalized for its mistakes, shiftlessness and inefficiency. I like business because its philosophy works. I like business because each day is a fresh, adventure. "Why I Like Business" in [http://www.newspapers.com/newspage/8420770/ Manitowoc Herald-Times (21 July 1927), p. 3]

„Most men become successful and famous, not through ambition, but through ability and character.“

— William Feather
Context: Many people are thwarted by excessive ambition. They want a hundred thousand dollars but are unwilling to save a hundred dollars. They want a big house, but do not accumulate enough money to make the down payment on on a small house. They want to write a book, but will not learn to write a letter. Most men become successful and famous, not through ambition, but through ability and character.

„He was known to some people as a writer.“

— William Feather
Context: He was known to some people as a writer. In his writings he espoused thrift, industry, promptness, perseverance, and dependability. … As far as was possible, the subject of this sketch practiced what he preached. Some of his enemies point to this trait as his foremost weakness. Obituary written for himself as one "that would be satisfactory to me in the event of an undesired, but possible, exit" in October 1933, as quoted in [http://blogs.voanews.com/tedlandphairsamerica/2008/10/06/featherisms/ "Featherisms" by Ted Landphair at VOA News (6 October 2008)]

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„Setting a good example for children takes all the fun out of middle age.“

— William Feather
Also quoted in Every Day Is Father's Day: The Best Things Ever Said About Dear Old Dad (1989), p. 150

„An education isn't how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It's being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don't. It's knowing where to go to find out what you need to know, and it's knowing how to use the information once you get it.“

— William Feather
As quoted in [http://books.google.com/books?id=Wm0jAQAAMAAJ&q=%22being+able+to+differentiate+between+what+you+do+know%22&dq=%22being+able+to+differentiate+between+what+you+do+know%22&hl=en&sa=X&ei=qYJOU9dAzoXRAYumgcAP&ved=0CMsCEOgBMDQ Telephony, Vol. 150 (1956), p. 23]; the first two sentences of this statement began to be attributed to Anatole France in the 1990s, but without any citations of sources.

„The wisdom of the wise and the experience of the ages is preserved into perpetuity by a nation's proverbs, fables, folk sayings and quotations.“

— William Feather
Attributed in Zebras & Picket Fences (2008) by Jakob Weiss; if this is a statement by Feather, it clearly derives from the earlier remarks of Isaac D'Israeli: "The wisdom of the wise, and the experience of ages, may be preserved by quotation." Since at least 1986 a paraphrased form misattributed to his son Benjamin Disraeli has also often been quoted: "The wisdom of the wise and the experience of the ages are perpetuated by quotations."

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