Zitate von Henri Fréderic Amiel

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Henri Fréderic Amiel

Geburtstag: 27. September 1821
Todesdatum: 11. Mai 1881
Andere Namen: Fréderik Henri Amiel

Henri-Frédéric Amiel war ein französischsprachiger Schweizer Schriftsteller und Philosoph.

Amiel war der erste Sohn des Kaufmanns Henri Amiel und Caroline Brandts. Nach dem Tod seiner Eltern wurde er im Alter von 13 Jahren von seinem Onkel Frédéric Amiel aufgenommen. Nach dem Antritt seiner Studien in Genf bereiste er die Schweiz, Italien, Frankreich und Belgien. In Deutschland hielt er sich zunächst neun Monate in Heidelberg auf; von 1844 bis 1848 lebte er in Berlin, wo er Philosophie , Psychologie sowie Philologie und Theologie studierte.

1849 kehrte er nach Genf zurück und wurde Professor für Ästhetik und französische Literatur an der Universität Genf dank einer Abhandlung über Du Mouvement littéraire dans la Suisse romande et de son avenir . Von 1854 bis zu seinem Tod hielt er zudem den Lehrstuhl für Philosophie.

Amiel publizierte mehrere Gedichtbände, historische und philologische Studien und philosophische Essays, die von der idealistischen deutschen Philosophie beeinflusst sind. Das populärste Werk, das er zu Lebzeiten veröffentlichte, war das patriotisch-militaristische Lied Roulez, tambours! .

Berühmt wurde Amiel mit seinem monumentalen Tagebuch , das man nach seinem Tod entdeckte. Die kurz danach publizierten Auszüge in zwei Bänden erregten großes Aufsehen wegen der Klarheit der Gedanken, der Aufrichtigkeit der Introspektion, der Genauigkeit der Einzelheiten, der entmutigenden Vision von Existenz und der Neigung zur Selbstkritik. Ende des 19. und Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts beeinflussten die Tagebücher Schriftsteller in der Schweiz, aber auch anderswo in Europa .

Zitate Henri Fréderic Amiel

„Tausend Dinge gehen vorwärts; neunhundertachtundneunzig zurück; das ist Fortschritt.“

—  Henri Fréderic Amiel

Original franz.: "Mille choses avancent, neuf cent quatre-vingt dix-huit reculent ; c'est là le progrès." - Journal intime, tome dixieme, Dezember 1874, Editions l'Age d'Homme, Lausanne 1991, S.178,

„Ein Irrtum ist umso gefährlicher, je mehr Wahrheit er enthält.“

—  Henri Fréderic Amiel

Original franz.: "Une erreur est d'autant plus dangereuse qu'elle contient plus de vérité." - Grains de Mil, Poésis et Pensées, Joel Chrbuliez, Libraire-editeur, Paris 1854, Pensèes, CXXVI. Paradoxe, S.181,

„Whether we will or no, there is an esoteric doctrine, there is a relative revelation; each man enters into God so much as God enters into him, or as Angelus, I think, said, "the eye by which I see God is the same eye by which He sees me."“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

1 October 1849; Amiel is here actually quoting Meister Eckhart, not Angelus Silesius as he supposed.
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Redemption, eternal life, divinity, humanity, propitiation, incarnation, judgment, Satan, heaven and hell — all these beliefs have been so materialized and coarsened, that with a strange irony they present to us the spectacle of things having a profound meaning and yet carnally interpreted. Christian boldness and Christian liberty must be reconquered; it is the church which is heretical, the church whose sight is troubled and her heart timid. Whether we will or no, there is an esoteric doctrine, there is a relative revelation; each man enters into God so much as God enters into him, or as Angelus, I think, said, "the eye by which I see God is the same eye by which He sees me."

„Whenever conscience speaks with a divided, uncertain, and disputed voice, it is not yet the voice of God.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

6 April 1851
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Whenever conscience speaks with a divided, uncertain, and disputed voice, it is not yet the voice of God. Descend still deeper into yourself, until you hear nothing but a clear and undivided voice, a voice which does away with doubt and brings with it persuasion, light and serenity.

„There is no repose for the mind except in the absolute; for feeling except in the infinite; for the soul except in the divine.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

Journal Intime (1882), Quotes used in the Introduction by Ward
Kontext: There is no repose for the mind except in the absolute; for feeling except in the infinite; for the soul except in the divine. Nothing finite is true, is interesting, is worthy to fix my attention. All that is particular is exclusive, and all that is exclusive repels me. There is nothing non-exclusive but the All; my end is communion with Being through the whole of Being.

„Cleverness is serviceable for everything, sufficient for nothing.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

16 February 1868
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Clever men will recognize and tolerate nothing but cleverness; every authority rouses their ridicule, every superstition amuses them, every convention moves them to contradiction. Only force finds favor in their eyes, and they have no toleration for anything that is not purely natural and spontaneous. And yet ten clever men are not worth one man of talent, nor ten men of talent worth one man of genius. And in the individual, feeling is more than cleverness, reason is worth as much as feeling, and conscience has it over reason. If, then, the clever man is not mockable, he may at least be neither loved, nor considered, nor esteemed. He may make himself feared, it is true, and force others to respect his independence; but this negative advantage, which is the result of a negative superiority, brings no happiness with it. Cleverness is serviceable for everything, sufficient for nothing.

„I believe in goodness, and I hope that good will prevail.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

31 August 1869
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: My mind has been a tumult of opposing systems, — Stoicism, Quietism, Buddhism, Christianity. Shall I never be at peace with myself? If impersonality is a good, why am I not consistent in the pursuit of it? and if it is a temptation, why return to it, after having judged and conquered it?
Is happiness anything more than a conventional fiction? The deepest reason for my state of doubt is that the supreme end and aim of life seems to me a mere lure and deception. The individual is an eternal dupe, who never obtains what he seeks, and who is forever deceived by hope. My instinct is in harmony with the pessimism of Buddha and of Schopenhauer. It is a doubt which never leaves me, even in my moments of religious fervor. Nature is indeed for me a Mala; and I look at her, as it were, with the eyes of an artist. My intelligence remains skeptical. What, then, do I believe in? I do not know. And what is it I hope for? It would be difficult to say. Folly! I believe in goodness, and I hope that good will prevail. Deep within this ironical and disappointed being of mine there is a child hidden — a frank, sad, simple creature, who believes in the ideal, in love, in holiness, and all heavenly superstitions. A whole millennium of idyls sleeps in my heart; I am a pseudo-skeptic, a pseudo-scoffer.

„We are hemmed round with mystery, and the greatest mysteries are contained in what we see and do every day.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

30 December 1850
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: The relation of thought to action filled my mind on waking, and I found myself carried toward a bizarre formula, which seems to have something of the night still clinging about it: Action is but coarsened thought; thought become concrete, obscure, and unconscious. It seemed to me that our most trifling actions, of eating, walking, and sleeping, were the condensation of a multitude of truths and thoughts, and that the wealth of ideas involved was in direct proportion to the commonness of the action (as our dreams are the more active, the deeper our sleep). We are hemmed round with mystery, and the greatest mysteries are contained in what we see and do every day. In all spontaneity the work of creation is reproduced in analogy. When the spontaneity is unconscious, you have simple action; when it is conscious, intelligent and moral action.

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„Everything is a symbol of a symbol, and a symbol of what? of mind.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

30 December 1850
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Everything which is, is thought, but not conscious and individual thought. The human intelligence is but the consciousness of being. It is what I have formulated before: Everything is a symbol of a symbol, and a symbol of what? of mind.

„There is nothing non-exclusive but the All; my end is communion with Being through the whole of Being.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

Journal Intime (1882), Quotes used in the Introduction by Ward
Kontext: There is no repose for the mind except in the absolute; for feeling except in the infinite; for the soul except in the divine. Nothing finite is true, is interesting, is worthy to fix my attention. All that is particular is exclusive, and all that is exclusive repels me. There is nothing non-exclusive but the All; my end is communion with Being through the whole of Being.

„Uncertainty is the refuge of hope.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

Amiel's journal; the Journal intime of Henri-Frédéric Amiel 1890 (p.368)
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Quelle: https://archive.org/details/amielsjournaljou00amieiala

„Every life has its potentiality of greatness“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

16 July 1848
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: To adore, to understand, to receive, to feel, to give, to act: there is my law my duty, my happiness, my heaven. Let come what come will — even death. Only be at peace with self, live in the presence of God, in communion with Him, and leave the guidance of existence to those universal powers against whom thou canst do nothing! If death gives me time, so much the better. If its summons is near, so much the better still; if a half-death overtake me, still so much the better, for so the path of success is closed to me only that I may find opening before me the path of heroism, of moral greatness and resignation. Every life has its potentiality of greatness, and as it is impossible to be outside God, the best is consciously to dwell in Him.

„Clever men will recognize and tolerate nothing but cleverness; every authority rouses their ridicule, every superstition amuses them, every convention moves them to contradiction. Only force finds favor in their eyes, and they have no toleration for anything that is not purely natural and spontaneous. And yet ten clever men are not worth one man of talent, nor ten men of talent worth one man of genius.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

16 February 1868
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Clever men will recognize and tolerate nothing but cleverness; every authority rouses their ridicule, every superstition amuses them, every convention moves them to contradiction. Only force finds favor in their eyes, and they have no toleration for anything that is not purely natural and spontaneous. And yet ten clever men are not worth one man of talent, nor ten men of talent worth one man of genius. And in the individual, feeling is more than cleverness, reason is worth as much as feeling, and conscience has it over reason. If, then, the clever man is not mockable, he may at least be neither loved, nor considered, nor esteemed. He may make himself feared, it is true, and force others to respect his independence; but this negative advantage, which is the result of a negative superiority, brings no happiness with it. Cleverness is serviceable for everything, sufficient for nothing.

„Each bud flowers but once and each flower has but its minute of perfect beauty; so, in the garden of the soul each feeling has, as it were, its flowering instant, its one and only moment of expansive grace and radiant kingship.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

30 December 1850
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Each bud flowers but once and each flower has but its minute of perfect beauty; so, in the garden of the soul each feeling has, as it were, its flowering instant, its one and only moment of expansive grace and radiant kingship. Each star passes but once in the night through the meridian over our heads and shines there but an instant; so, in the heaven of the mind each thought touches its zenith but once, and in that moment all its brilliancy and all its greatness culminate. Artist, poet, or thinker, if you want to fix and immortalize your ideas or your feelings, seize them at this precise and fleeting moment, for it is their highest point. Before it, you have but vague outlines or dim presentiments of them. After it you will have only weakened reminiscence or powerless regret; that moment is the moment of your ideal.

„Heroism is the brilliant triumph of the soul over the flesh — that is to say, over fear: fear of poverty, of suffering, of calumny, of sickness, of isolation, and of death.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

1 October 1849
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Heroism is the brilliant triumph of the soul over the flesh — that is to say, over fear: fear of poverty, of suffering, of calumny, of sickness, of isolation, and of death. There is no serious piety without heroism. Heroism is the dazzling and glorious concentration of courage.

„Christianity, if it is to triumph over pantheism, must absorb it.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

1 October 1849
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Christianity, if it is to triumph over pantheism, must absorb it. To our pusillanimous eyes Jesus would have borne the marks of a hateful pantheism, for he confirmed the Biblical phrase "ye are gods," and so would St. Paul, who tells us that we are of "the race of God." Our century wants a new theology — that is to say, a more profound explanation of the nature of Christ and of the light which it flashes upon heaven and upon humanity.

„To adore, to understand, to receive, to feel, to give, to act: there is my law my duty, my happiness, my heaven. Let come what come will — even death.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

16 July 1848
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: To adore, to understand, to receive, to feel, to give, to act: there is my law my duty, my happiness, my heaven. Let come what come will — even death. Only be at peace with self, live in the presence of God, in communion with Him, and leave the guidance of existence to those universal powers against whom thou canst do nothing! If death gives me time, so much the better. If its summons is near, so much the better still; if a half-death overtake me, still so much the better, for so the path of success is closed to me only that I may find opening before me the path of heroism, of moral greatness and resignation. Every life has its potentiality of greatness, and as it is impossible to be outside God, the best is consciously to dwell in Him.

„Action limits us; whereas in the state of contemplation we are endlessly expansive. Will localizes us; thought universalizes us.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel

8 March 1868
The will localizes us, thought universalizes us. My soul wavers between two, four, six general and contradictory conceptions, for it obeys all the great instincts of human nature, and aspires to the absolute, which can only be realized by a succession of contraries.
As translated in The Private Journal of Henri Frédéric Amiel (1935), p. 238
Journal Intime (1882), Journal entries
Kontext: Action limits us; whereas in the state of contemplation we are endlessly expansive. Will localizes us; thought universalizes us. My soul wavers between half a dozen antagonistic general conceptions, because it is responsive to all the great instincts of human nature, and its aspiration is to the absolute, which is only to be reached through a succession of contraries. It has taken me a great deal of time to understand myself, and I frequently find myself beginning over again the study of the oft-solved problem, so difficult is it for us to maintain any fixed point within us. I love everything, and detest one thing only — the hopeless imprisonment of my being within a single arbitrary form, even were it chosen by myself. Liberty for the inner man is then the strongest of my passions — perhaps my only passion. Is such a passion lawful? It has been my habit to think so, but intermittently, by fits and starts. I am not perfectly sure of it.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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