Zitate von Ben Jonson

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Ben Jonson

Geburtstag: 21. Juni 1572
Todesdatum: 6. August 1637

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Ben Jonson, eigentlich Benjamin Jonson , war ein englischer Bühnenautor und Dichter. Neben William Shakespeare gilt Ben Jonson als der bedeutendste englische Dramatiker der Renaissance.

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Zitate Ben Jonson

„Trink mir nur mit den Augen zu, // mein Blick tut dir Bescheid; // und bleibt ein Kuß für mich im Glas, // den Wein ich gerne meid'.“

—  Ben Jonson
Ben Jonson: An Celia (orig.: To Celia) übersetzt von Paula Stern, in: Komm leb mit mir, Silva-Verlag Iserlohn, 1947, S. 21

„Shine forth, thou star of poets, and with rage,
Or influence, chide, or cheer the drooping stage,
Which, since thy flight from hence, hath mourn'd like night,
And despairs day, but for thy volumes light.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Sweet swan of Avon! what a sight it were To see thee in our water yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James. But stay, I see thee in the hemisphere Advanc'd, and made a constellation there! Shine forth, thou star of poets, and with rage, Or influence, chide, or cheer the drooping stage, Which, since thy flight from hence, hath mourn'd like night, And despairs day, but for thy volumes light. Lines 71 - 80

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„For though the poet's matter nature be,
His art doth give the fashion. And that he
Who casts to write a living line, must sweat“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Yet must I not give nature all: thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion. And that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine arc) and strike the second heat Upon the muses anvil; turn the fame, And himself with it, that he thinks to frame; Or for the laurel, he may gain a scorn, For a good poet's made, as well as born. And such wert thou. Look how the father's face Lives in his issue, even so the race Of Shakspeare's mind and manners brightly shines In his well-turned, and true filed lines: In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Lines 55 - 70

„In each of which he seems to shake a lance,
As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Yet must I not give nature all: thy art, My gentle Shakspeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion. And that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine arc) and strike the second heat Upon the muses anvil; turn the fame, And himself with it, that he thinks to frame; Or for the laurel, he may gain a scorn, For a good poet's made, as well as born. And such wert thou. Look how the father's face Lives in his issue, even so the race Of Shakspeare's mind and manners brightly shines In his well-turned, and true filed lines: In each of which he seems to shake a lance, As brandish'd at the eyes of ignorance. Lines 55 - 70

„Thou art a monument, without a tomb,
And art alive still, while thy book doth live,
And we have wits to read, and praise to give.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise; I will not lodge thee by Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room; Thou art a monument, without a tomb, And art alive still, while thy book doth live, And we have wits to read, and praise to give. Lines 17 - 24; this was inspired by a eulogy by William Basse, On Shakespeare:

„Drink to me only with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup
And I'll not look for wine.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine. I sent thee late a rosy wreath, Not so much honoring thee As giving it a hope that there It could not withered be. But thou thereon didst only breathe, And sent'st it back to me; Since when it grows and smells, I swear, Not of itself, but thee. Song, To Celia, lines 1-16; this poem was inspired by "Letter XXIV" of Philostratus, which in translation reads: "Drink to me with your eyes alone…. And if you will, take the cup to your lips and fill it with kisses, and give it so to me".

„Why should we defer our joys?
Fame and rumour are but toys.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Come my Celia, let us prove, While we can, the sports of love; Time will not be ours forever, He at length our good will sever. Spend not then his gifts in vain; Suns that set may rise again, But if once we lose this light, 'Tis with us perpetual night. Why should we defer our joys? Fame and rumour are but toys. Song, To Celia, lines 1-10. Compare Catullus, Carmina V

„He was not of an age, but for all time!“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Triumph, my Britain, thou hast one to show To whom all Scenes of Europe homage owe. He was not of an age, but for all time! And all the muses still were in their prime, When, like Apollo, he came forth to warm Our ears, or like a Mercury to charm! Nature herself was proud of his designs, And joy'd to wear the dressing of his lines! Which were so richly spun, and woven so sit, As, since she will vouchsafe no other wit. Lines 41 - 50

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„Come my Celia, let us prove,
While we can, the sports of love;
Time will not be ours forever,
He at length our good will sever.“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Come my Celia, let us prove, While we can, the sports of love; Time will not be ours forever, He at length our good will sever. Spend not then his gifts in vain; Suns that set may rise again, But if once we lose this light, 'Tis with us perpetual night. Why should we defer our joys? Fame and rumour are but toys. Song, To Celia, lines 1-10. Compare Catullus, Carmina V

„Soul of the age!
The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage!“

—  Ben Jonson
Context: Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise; I will not lodge thee by Chaucer or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room; Thou art a monument, without a tomb, And art alive still, while thy book doth live, And we have wits to read, and praise to give. Lines 17 - 24; this was inspired by a eulogy by William Basse, On Shakespeare:

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